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Jan – Mar 2012

Dawah, Jan - Mar 2012

Various Latino Muslim Events

Latino Muslims: Letters from Al-Andalus

https://www.facebook.com/events/181547835291064/

[Description]

Learn about the Muslim Cultural Legacy from Islamic Spain to the US featuring guest speakers on:
* From Andalus to El Barrio (NY) w / Omar Abdur-Rahim Ocasio
* Latino Muslims: Service and Advocacy w / Latino Muslims from MPAC and MWB
* The Next Wave

March 17, 2012 (5-8pm)
America’s Islamic Heritage Museum
Washington DC

Latino Muslims, Latino Friends, and all Seekers of Knowledge Encouraged to Attend.

Capacity of 60+ guests. Please RSVP.

http://mydahyouth.weebly.com/
http://muslimsinamerica.org/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WOW9v6JfsFY

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Latino Muslim Gathering

Saturday, March 03

http://www.dfwinternational.org/calendar/event.php?m=201203&i=4f3c4e6c42a3c

PLEASE JOIN US on Saturday, March 3 for a special Latino / Hispanic Muslim Gathering at Islamic Center of Irving! “Strength in Unity: Importance of Community and Dawah”. Special guest speaker: Imam Daniel Abudullah Hernandez from Houston. Delicious food and refreshments will be served. Please SPREAD THE WORD & invite Latino / Hispanic Muslims you know!

LOCATION: Islamic Center of Irving, 2555 Esters Road in Irving
PRESENTED BY: Islamic Center of Irving
WEBSITE: http://iciwork.org/outreach/

2 pm – 5 pm
FREE


Latina Muslimah Meet / GreetSaturday, March 31, 2012
1:30 pm until 6:00 pmICNA DAWAH CENTER,
3650 SAVANNAH PL DRIVE
DULUTH, GA 30096

https://www.facebook.com/events/308015429262218/

Come join your Latina sisters for a wonderful afternoon filled with good food and good company. Insha Allah we will have a brief discussion on:
* Islam and Your Family.
* Muslim Leadership.
* Culture & Islam

Please share with others and bring a friend.

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The North Hudson Islamic Educational Center
http://www.nhiec.com/
Wednesday Islamic Studies
Every week from 7p-9p

Asalaamu Alaykum wa Rahmatullah wa Barakatuhu (May the Peace, Mercy and Blessings of Allah be upon you)
May you be in the best of health and faith (iman). We are delighted to continue offering classes on Islam with various topics to suit your needs and religious quest for Islamic knowledge. That they are of benefit, ameen.
Tomorrow’s topic is Principles of Islamic Belief taught by Brother Musa Álvaro. The class is in Spanish and English, as needed.
The monthly class schedule (usually in English with Spanish translation as needed) is as
follows : * Advanced Studies in Qur’an and Hadith by Shaykh Mohamed Alhayek (the first week)
* Principles of Islamic Beliefs by Brother Musa (second week )
* The Four Caliphs of Islam by brother. Yusef (3rd week the following days: (3/21, 5/16, 7/18) and the other days will be Sh. Alhayek.
* An introduction to Islam (book & quot; Focused Islam & quot;) by brother Melvin (4th week)
* Learn the Salat (prayer) every Wednesday from 5: 30-6: 30 by Sister Nylka (brothers and sisters)
* Question and Answers every Wednesday by Shaykh Mohamed Alhayek
Contact us if you have any additional questions! Jazaakum Allahu Khairun (Allah rewards him for good).

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3-Day Da’wah Event

Jan - Mar 2012, Spain

Phrases for Muslim Travelers – Spanish

MuslimSpeak

Phrases for Muslim Travellers – Spanish

June 17, 2009

Spanish Pronunciation Guide

Most letters are similar or same as they are in English, the main exceptions are explained below.
Z is pronounced as ‘th’ – like thin in English, and as ‘s’ in the southern areas of Spain.
C is pronounced like a ‘k’ when it is followed by an a, o or u. So ‘carro’ is pronounced like ‘karro.
C is pronounced like a ‘th’ when followed by an i or an e, and like an ‘s’ in the southern areas of Spain. So ‘cinco’ is pronounced as ‘thinko’ in the north and ‘sinko’ in the south.
CH is pronounced like ‘ch’ in English (as in chicken)
H before a vowel (unless as ch) is never pronounced, it is silent. So ‘hasta’ is pronounced ‘asta’.
J is pronounced like ‘kh’ in Arabic however it may also be pronounced as a ‘h’ and it will be understood.
G is pronounced like ‘kh’ in Arabic when an i or e follow it. So ‘people’ is pronounced as ‘khente / hente’. However ‘handsome’ is pronounced as ‘gwapo’ with a hard g sound like in English.
LL is pronounced as ‘ly’. So ‘paella’ is pronounced as ‘paelya’.

PRAYER
(The Prayer)

May I pray here?
Can you pray here?

In which direction is the Qiblah?
In what sense is the Qiblah?

What time is Fajr?
What is the time of Fajr?

AT THE MOSQUE
(The mosque)

Where is the nearest Masjid?
Where is the nearest mosque?

Where can I make wudhu ‘?
Where can I do wudhu ‘(ablution)?

Where is the toilet?
Where is the bathroom?

Is there a section for women?
Is there a section for women?

What is the name of this Masjid?
What is the name of this mosque?

Who is the Imam of this Masjid?
Who is the imam of the mosque?

May I take photos of the Masjid?
Can I take photos of the mosque?

MARRIAGE
(Marriage)

Are you married?
You’re married? (said to a man)
Are you married? (said to a woman)

I am (not) married
I am not married (for a man)
I am not married (for a woman)

How many wives do you have?
How many wifes do you have?

I have 1/2/3/4 wives
I have one / two / three / four wife / s

I am looking to get married
I’m trying to marry

I am (not) interested in getting married right now
(No)

FOOD
(Kitchen)

Do you serve Halaal food here?
Do you serve jalál food here?

Where can I find a place which serves Halaal food?
Where can I find a place that serves jalál food?

Where may I buy Halaal meat?
Where can I buy jalál meat?

Is this Halaal?
Is this jalál?

No thanks, I’m fasting
No thanks, I’m fasting

Where may I buy dates from?
Where can I buy the dates?

SHOPPING / CLOTHING
(Shopping / Dress)

Where can I buy Islamic clothing?
Where can I buy Islamic clothing?

How much is this?
How much?

Where can I find an Abayah / Thawb
Where can I find an Abaya / a Zaub (Yalabía)?

If I buy two can you give me a discount?
If I buy two can you give me a discount?

Is there an Islamic Bookstore here?
Is there an Islamic book store here?

Do you have a copy of the Qur’an (in Arabic / English / Spanish)?
Is there a copy of the Quran (in Arabic / English / Spanish)?

CONVERSATION
(conversation)

Yes
yes

No
no

Excuse me
with permission

I’m sorry
sorry

Do you speak English / Arabic?
Do you speak English / Arabic?

I understand
I understand

I do not understand
do not understand

I’m sorry, this is against my religion
Sorry, this is against my religion

I’m sorry, I am not accustomed to this
Sorry, I’m not used to this

I prefer not to mingle with the opposite sex
I prefer not to mix with the opposite sex

I do not make any physical contact with the opposite sex
I can not make any physical contact with the opposite sex

What is your religion?
What is your religion?

I am Muslim
I am Muslim

This is forbidden in Islam
This is forbidden in Islam

There is a difference of opinion about this
There is a difference of opinion about this

I do not follow that opinion I do not follow
this opinion

This is kufr!
This is blasphemy!

This is Shirk!
This is polytheism!

This is (not) Haraam
This (not) is Jarám

ISLAMIC PHRASES
(Islamic Phrases)

Jazakum ‘Allahu Khayran
May God reward you with good

Wa Iyyakum
And also you

Barak ‘Allahu Fikum
May God bless you

Sallallahu `Alayhi wa Sallam
May the peace and blessings of God be upon him

Insha ‘Allah
God willing

Islam, Jan - Mar 2012

Muslim and Muslim Characteristics

http://nurelislam.com/caracter.htm

Introduction:

Praise be to Allaah who gave us this life and the opportunity to worship him, and blessings be upon the last of his messengers, Muhammad saw. Good manners are indispensable in the life of the believer and every believer should try to put them into practice.

This little book does not explain all the manners of Islam being that these are many, however it is an effort to make you know some of them. Islamic manners are a way to get closer to our creator, and by putting these into practice we can obtain a personality according to what Allah has revealed. Muhammad (saw) told us that having good manners is better than fasting during the day and praying all night.

Characteristics of the Muslim and Muslim:

Manners in Islam are external behaviors that reflect the personality of the believer, which is made up of a series of characteristics, among these are:

Patience: A basic attribute of a good believer is not to get angry. Once a companion of the prophet asked for advice and he said: “Do not be angry, do not be angry”.

And Allah – Praised and Exalted – exalts those who are patient by saying “by the way Allah is with the patients”. and in another verse it says: “; Believers are those who seek the help of Allah through patience and prayer”;

Al Dikr: Another basic characteristic of a good believer is that he always remembers Allah. As Allah says “; Believers are those who remember Allah sitting or lying down.” The good believer looks for the ideal reminder for every moment and place. The believer makes a lot of du a (supplications to allah). He is always aware that Allah hears him and pleads with him to forgive him, guide him, give him

Paradise, and all the good stuff.

To love Allah and his messenger: Another characteristic is to love Allah and his Prophet above all things, the Prophet (pb A. e.) Informs us that to be good believers we need three characteristics: 1. To love Allah and his messenger above all things, 2. Loving and hating for God alone, 3. Fearing becoming unbelieving as fearing being thrown into the fire.

It is indispensable for the believer to love the Prophet (pb A. e.) And everything he taught us because it was him who chose Allah to teach us how to worship him.

Good wishes: Another characteristic of the believer is wanting for his brother what he wants for himself. Said the Prophet (pb A. e.) That: “; He is not a believer who does not want for his brother what he wishes for himself” ;.

Commitment to others: Continuing, the Muslim has obligations to his parents, his relatives, his neighbors and Muslims in general. A Muslim cannot stop greeting his brother for more than three days. A person who eats his fill knowing that his neighbor is hungry is not a Muslim.

Respect for the affairs of others: Muhammad (saw) told us that one’s best Islam is not to meddle with other people’s affairs. Allah and his messenger have warned us not to slander our brothers, not to talk about them when they are absent, even if we know of their mistake it is better to hide it and not tell it to others. He who covers the error of a brother Ala will cover his errors on the day of judgment.

Knowledge: Another characteristic of the believer is wanting to increase his knowledge. Muhammad (pb A. e.) Constantly asked Allah – Praised and Exalted – not to allow the sun to set until he learned something new. In other words, every day I wanted to know something more about their Faith. Allah also says in the Qur’an: “Perhaps those who know are the same as those who do not know”;

And Allah also teaches us a supplication in the Qur’an which is: “; OH Allah! Increase my knowledge”;

Tell the truth: Another characteristic of the believer is to always tell the truth. Muhammad was once asked (pb A. e.) Can the believer be a coward? and he answered Yes. Again they asked him if he can be the miserly believer? and he said yes, and then they asked him if he can be a Muslim who is lying? and he said No. The Muslim is by word of mouth and lying is characteristic of the hypocrite.

Repentance: The believer always seeks forgiveness from Allah, since he does not feel like an angel or anything like that. Muhammad (pb A. e.) Said “; ask God for forgiveness, by the way I do it more than 100 times a day”; Says the Qur’an: “; Allah loves those who repent”.

Al Tawaqul: Putting dependence on God. The believer knows that all dominion is in the hands of Allah, that something does not happen without God’s will and that God provides food to his servants like a bird when he leaves his nest in the morning and returns in the afternoon fed.

Works: Another characteristic of the believer is wanting to carry out good works [sabiq bil jairat] out of fear of God. Doing more than God requires you to do, hoping that what you do more will complete what you failed to do.

Cleanliness: Another characteristic of the good believer is that he is clean (mutajr). Always know that God loves the clean and orderly.

Ihsan: Another characteristic of the believer is knowing that God always watches over him, even though one does not see or hear him.

The characteristics of the good believer in Islam are many and the best were from the Prophet (pb A. e.) As Allah tells us: “; by the way, the Prophet have the best of examples to follow”. So we just have to study the life of Muhammed (saw).

The Prophet also says (pb A. e.), That “he who has good manners is better than the one who prays and fasts all day and all night”. Let us ask Allah Most High to give us some of these characteristics.

Some manners of the daily life of the Muslim man and woman:

When we start something, we must say:

Bi-smiLlaji-r-Rajmani-r-Rajim (In the name of Allah, the Merciful, the Merciful)

When we meet a Muslim, we say: As-Salamu Alai-kum (Peace be with you)

The person answers: Wa-Alai-Kumu-s-Salam (And with you be peace)

When we wake up in the morning, we should thank Allah (Praised and Exalted) and say

Al-jamdu li-Llahi-l-Ladí Ajya-na Ba da Ma Amata-na Wa-laihi-n-Nushuur

(Praise be to Allaah, Who brought us back to life after killing us, we will return to Him)

The beautiful sunrise. When we see the beauty of the morning we must say:

A baj-na wa-A baja-l-Mulku Li-Llahi Rabbi-l-} lamîn (a)

(We enter in the morning, and the entire kingdom belongs to Allah, the Lord of the worlds)

Instead when we see something man-made that impresses us we should say

La Jawla, wa-La Quwwata Illa bi-Llahi (i) There is no power or strength but that of Allah.

When we go into the bathroom we don’t do Dikr. We sit down so that our urine (which is impure) does not splash on us.

When we leave the bathroom after washing, we say:

Gjufarana-ka, Al-Jamdu Li-Llaji-L-Ladhi Adhhaba Anni-l- Ad ha wa- Afani
(Forgiveness OH Allah! Praise be to Allah who caused me to heal from what was bothering me and gave me relief)

Finishing going to the bathroom we wash our hands and </p>
<p> preferably we do Wudhu (ablution) to continue in a state of purity.

It is better for us to pray together in the mosque. When we enter the mosque, we enter with the right foot first, and we say:

Alaumma Iftaj Lî Abwaba Rajmati-k (a) (O Allah! Open the doors of Your mercy for me)

When we leave the mosque after praying, we say:

Alaumma Innî Asalu-ka min Fadli-k (a)
(O Allah! I ask you to give me your goodness)

When he meets his brothers, he greets them in an Islamic way, trying to be the first to give salams. When you talk to them, try to smile at them and if
<p> they are gathered in a circle, do not point your feet towards them. When he sits down to chat about something, he tries to remind himself of God, and at the end he says:

or Sbjanaka Ala Juma hua bijamdika ashadu an la ilaha il-la anta astagfiruka hua atubu ileika. Glory to You OH Allah, and praise be yours, I am a witness
<p> that there is no God but You, I seek your forgiveness and I repent to You. If you say this, anything wrong you have said is forgiven.

When we are ready to leave the house, we say:

Bi-smiLlah, Tawakkaltu Ala Llah (i) wa-La Jawla, wa-La Quwwata Illa bi-Llahi (i)

(In the name of Allah, I depend on Allah, and there is no greatness or power except that (it is permitted) by Allah)

We should visit sick people and pray to Allah (Praised and Exalted) for their recovery:

As alu-Llaha-l- Adzima Rabba-l-Arshi An Yushfik (a) (I ask Allah, the Almighty, Lord of the Throne, to heal you)

When we sneeze we say:

Al-jamdu Li-Llahi Ala Kulli Jal (in) (Praise be to Allaah under all circumstances)

And when we hear someone sneeze, we say: Yarjamu-ka Ala (u) (May Allah have mercy on you)

When we travel in a car, on a train, or on an airplane, we must say this du {SYMBOL 145 \ f “; Calligrapher Euro”;} to:

Bi-smiLlahi wa-l-Jamdu li-Llah. Subjana-l-Ladhi Sakjkjara La-na Hadha wa-Ma Kun-na La-hu Muqrinîn. Wa- Inna ila Rabbi-na la-Munqalibun.

(In the name of Allah, and praise be to Allah. Glory to Him who has created this transport for us, even though we were unable to create it (by ourselves
<p>); we will return to our Lord)

When we return home safe and sound from a trip we should thank Allah (Albados and Exalted) and say: Alaumma Inni As alu-ka Kjair-l-Maulich (i) wa-

<p> Kjaira-l-Makjrach (i). Bi-smiLlahi Walach-na wa-Bi-smiLlahi Kjarach-na wa- Ala-Llahi Rabbi-na Tawakkal-na.
(Oh Allah! I ask for the best entrance and the best exit. In the name of Allah we go out, and in Allah our Lord, we put our trust)

When we sit down to eat our food together he remembers that Allah is the one who provided him with food and he begins by saying:

Alaumma Barik Lana Fî-ma Razaqta-na wa-Qi-na Adhaba-n-Nar, Bi-smiLlah (O Allah! Bless the provisions that you have given us, and protect us from the punishment of hell, in the name of Allah) When eating

The one who serves does it from the right, eats what is in front of him (if they eat from a plate all together) and with the right, he makes sure that his brother serves before himself and does not eat lying down or blow his food .
After we have finished eating and drinking, we should give thanks for the food and drink that Allah has provided for us, and we say:

Al-Jamdu li-Llahi-l-Ladhî At ama-na wa-Saqa-na wa-cha ala-na mina-l-Muslimîn (Praise be to Allaah, who has fed and watered us and made us Muslims)

If we are angry, we must control ourselves by saying these words:

To udhu bi-Llahi Mina-sh-Shaitan (i). (I seek refuge in Allah from Satan.

When we hear good news, we should say:

Al-Jamdu li-Llahi-l-Ladhi bi-Ni mati-hi Tatimmu- – alijat (u) (Praise be to Allaah, with whose benevolence good things are perfected)

Whenever we are sad, or in trouble, we ask for Allah’s help by saying:

La Ilaha Illa Anta, Subjana-ka Innî Kuntu Mina-zd-Zdalimin (a) (There is no deity but You, Glory to You, OH Allah !, surely I was one of those who do evil)

We should end our day by saying this du to when we go to bed:

Bi-smi-ka Llahumma Amûtu wa- Ajya (In your name, OH Allah, I die and live)
Let us ask our creator for the Most Merciful and Merciful to allow us to put into practice some of these manners. and allow us to enter paradise and protect us from the tortures of hell. Ameen.

Jan - Mar 2012, Latin America

Two Spanish-Language Islamic TV Channels to Broadcast in Spain & Latin America

IslamToday

12/21/2011

http://en.islamtoday.net/artshow-235-4293.htm

A new Islamic TV channel in the Spanish language starts broadcasting today in Spain with a second Islamic station following a week later.

Hispan TV will be available in Spain and Latin America starting today. The station has Iranian backing. Following closely on its heels on 01 January 2012, the Saudi-backed Cordoba Television station will be launched, o.wned by the Foundation for the Message of Islam.

Headlines on HispanTV’s website, live for a year ahead of the broadcast launch, covered a range of world stories including alleged US spying in Iran, the IMF and the economic crisis, and Venezuelan leader Hugo Chavez.

Trailers for forthcoming documentaries on the channel included subjects such as the suffering of Palestinian civilians in Gaza. The channel will also broadcast television dramas and films.

“HispanTV is born with a great social vocation, aiming principally to build bridges of understanding between the people of Iran, Latin America and the Middle East by broadcasting content often ignored by other media,” the channel said in a statement.

The Foundation behind the Saudi-backed station is headed by Sheikh Abdulaziz Al Fazwan. The foundation also runs the Ikhtariya stations in Saudi Arabia and Al Majd in the UAE. The Cordoba station will address millions of Hispanic Muslims and non-Muslims around the world.

Sheik Fawzan said that the new channel will be centered in Spain but broadcast to the millions of Spanish speakers in the Americas, Africa as well as Spain

These two stations are the first full-scale Spanish-language Islamic TV stations in the world.

Sources:

“Islamic TV in Spanish language to launch on 21 December” Telecom December 21, 2011

“Iran launches news channel in Spanish” Khaleej Times December 21, 2011

Islam, Jan - Mar 2012

Abdullah Ibn Hudhafah As-Sahmi

From: “Companions of The Prophet”, Vol.1, By: Abdul Wahid Hamid.
MSA of the University of Missouri-Rolla
http://web.umr.edu/~msaumr/reference/companions/English/sahmi.html

History would have by-passed this man as it had by-passed thousands of Arabs before him. He, like them, would have had no claim to attention or fame. The greatness of Islam, however, gave to Abdullah ibn Hudhafah the opportunity to meet two world potentates of his time “Khusraw Parvez the King of Persia and Heraclius, the Byzantine emperor.

The story of his encounter with Khusraw Parvez began in the sixth year of the hijrah when the Prophet decided to send some of his Companions with letters to rulers outside the Arabian peninsula inviting them to Islam.

The Prophet attached great importance to this initiative. These messengers were going to distant lands with whom there was no agreement or treaty. They did not know the languages ​​of these lands nor anything about the ways and disposition of their rulers. They were to invite these rulers to give up their religion and forsake their power and glory and enter the religion of a people who shortly before were almost their subjects. The mission was undoubtedly hazardous.

To make known his plan, the Prophet called his companions together and addressed them. He started by praising God and thanking Him. He then recited the Shahadah and went on:

“I want to send some of you to the rulers of foreign lands but don’t dispute with me as the Israelites disputed with Jesus, the son of Mary.

“O Prophet of God, we shall carry out whatever you wish,” they responded. “Send us wherever you desire.”

The Prophet commissioned six of his Sahabah to carry his letters to Arab and foreign rulers. One of these was Abdullah ibn Hudhafah. He was chosen to take the Prophet’s letter to Khusraw Parvez, the Persian king.

Abdullah got his camel ready and bade farewell to his wife and son. He set out, alone, and traversed mountains and valleys until he reached the land of the Persians.

He sought permission to enter into the king’s presence informing the guards of the letter he was carrying. Khusraw Parvez thereupon ordered his audience chamber to be made ready and summoned his prominent aides. When they had assembled he gave permission for Abdullah to enter.

Abdullah entered and saw the Persian potentate dressed in delicate, flowing robes and wearing a great, neatly arranged turban. On Abdullah was the plain, coarse clothes of the bedouin. His head though was held high and his feet were firm. The honor of Islam burned fiercely in his breast and .he power of faith pulsed in his heart.

As soon as Khusraw Parvez saw him approaching he signalled to one of his men to take the letter from his hand.

“No,” said Abdullah. “The Prophet commanded me to hand over this letter to you directly and I shall not go against a command of the Messenger of God.”

“Let him come near to me,” Khusraw said to his guards and Abdullah went forward and handed over the letter. Khusraw then called an Arab clerk who originally came from Hira and ordered him to open the letter in his presence and read its contents. He began reading: “In the name of Allah, the Beneficent the Merciful. From Muhammad, the Messenger of God, to Khusraw the ruler of Persia. Peace on whoever follows the guidance…”

Khusraw only heard this much of the letter when the fire of anger burst within him. His face became red and he began to perspire around the neck. He snatched the letter from the clerk’s hand and began tearing it to pieces without knowing what else it contained and shouted, “Does he dare to write to me like this, he who is my slave”? He was angry that the Prophet had not given him precedence in his letter. He then commanded Abdullah to be expelled from his assembly.

Abdullah was taken away, not knowing what would happen to him. Would he be killed or would he be set free? But he did not want to wait to find out. He said, “By God, I don’t care what happens to me after the letter of the Prophet has been so badly treated.” I have managed to get to his camel and rode off.

When Khusraw’s anger had subsided he commanded that Abdullah be brought before him. But Abdullah was nowhere to be found. They searched for him all the way to the Arabian peninsula but found that he had gone ahead.

Back in Madinah, Abdullah told the Prophet how Khusraw had turned his letter to pieces and the Prophet’s only reply was, “May God tear up his kingdom”.

Meanwhile, Khusraw wrote to Badhan, his deputy in the Yemen, to send two strong men to “that man who has appeared in the Hijaz” with orders to bring him to Persia.

Badhan despatched two of his strongest men to the Prophet and gave them a letter to him in which he was ordered to go with the two men to meet Khusraw without delay. Badhan also asked the two men to get whatever information they could on the Prophet and to study his message closely.

The men set out, moving very quickly. At Ta’if they met some Quraysh traders and asked them about Muhammad. “He is in Yathrib,” they said and they went on to Makkah feeling extremely happy. This was good news for them and they went around telling other Quraysh, “You will be pleased. Khusraw is out to get Muhammad and you will be rid of his evil.”

The two men meanwhile made straight for Madinah where they met the Prophet, handed him the letter of Badhan and said to him, “The king of kings, Khusraw, has written to our ruler Badhan to send his men to get you. We have come to take you with us. If you come willingly, Khusraw has said that it will be good for you and he will spare you any punishment. If you refuse, you will know the power of his punishment. He has power to destroy you and your people. “

The Prophet smiled and said to them, “Go back to your mounts today and return tomorrow.”

On the following day, they came to the Prophet and said to him, “Are you prepared to go with us to meet Khusraw?”

“You shall not meet Khusraw after today,” replied the Prophet. “God has killed him and his son Shirwaih has taken his place on such a night and on such a month.”

The two men stared in the face of the Prophet. They were completely dumbfounded.

“Do you know what you are saying?” they asked. “Shall we write about this to Badhan?”

“Yes,” replied the Prophet, “and say to him that my religion has informed me about what has happened to the kingdom of Khusraw and that if he should become Muslim, I would appoint him ruler over what he now controls.”

The two men returned to the Yemen and told Badhan what had happened. Badhan said, “If what Muhammad has said is true, then he is a Prophet. If not then we shall see what happens to him.”

Not long afterwards, a letter from Shirwaih came to Badhan in which he said, “I killed Khusraw because of his tyranny against our people. He regarded as lawful the killing of leaders, the capturing of their women and the expropriating of their wealth When. this my letter reaches you, take the allegiance of whoever is with you on my behalf. “

As soon as Badhan had read Shirwaih’s letter, he threw it aside and announced his entry into Islam. The Persians with him in the Yemen also became Muslim.

That’s the story of Abdullah ibn Hudhafah’s meeting with the Persian king. His meeting with the Byzantine emperior took place during the caliphate of Umar ibn alKhattab. It too is an astonishing story.

In the nineteenth year after the Hijrah, Umar despatched an army to fight against the Byzantines. In it was Abdullah ibn Hudhafah. News of the Muslim force reached the Byzantine emperior. He had heard of their sincerity of faith, and their willingness to sacrifice their lives in the way of God and His Prophet. He gave orders to his men to bring him any Muslim captive they might take alive.

God willed that Abdullah ibn Hudhafah should fall captive to the Byzantines and he was brought before the Emperor. The Emperor looked at Abdullah for a long time. Suddenly he said, “I shall make a proposal to you.” “What is it?” asked Abdullah.

“I suggest that you become a Christian. If you do this, you will be set free and I shall grant you a safe refuge.”

The prisoner’s reaction was furious: “Death is preferable to me a thousand times to what you ask me to do.”

“I see that you are a bold man. However, if you respond positively to what I propose to you, I will give you a share in my authority and swear you in as my aide.”

The prisoner, shackled in his chains, smiled and said, “By God, if you give me all that you possess and all that the Arabs have in exchange for giving up the religion of Muhammad, I shall not do so.” “Then I shall kill you.”

“Do what you want,” answered Abdullah.

The emperor then had him put on a cross and ordered his soldiers to throw spears at him, first near his hands and then near his feet, all the while telling him to accept Christianity or at least give up his religion. This he refused over and over again to do.

The emperor then had him taken down from the wooden cross. He called for a great pot to be brought. This was filled with oil which was then heated under a fierce fire. He then had two other Muslim prisoners brought and had one of them thrown into the boiling oil. The prisoner’s flesh sizzled and soon his bones could be seen. The emperor turned to Abdullah and invited him to Christianity.

This was the most terrible test that Abdullah had had to face up till now. But he remained firm and the emperor gave up trying. He then ordered that Abdullah too be thrown into the pot. As he was being taken away he began to shed tears. The emperor thought that he had at last been broken and had him brought back to him. He once more suggested that Abdullah become a Christian but to his astonishment, Abdullah refused.

“Damn you! Why did you weep then?” shouted the emperor.

“I cried,” said Abdullah, “because I said to myself: ‘You will now be thrown into this pot and your soul will depart’. What I really desired then was to have as many souls as the number of hairs on my body and to have all of them thrown into this pot for the sake of God. “

The tyrant then said, “Will you kiss my head? I will then set you free?” “And all the Muslim prisoners also?” asked Abdullah.

This the emperor agreed to do and Abdullah said to himself, “One of the enemies of God! I shall kiss his head and he shall set me and all other Muslim prisoners free. There can be no blame on me for doing this.” He then went up to the emperor and kissed his forehead. All the Muslim prisoners were released and handed over to Abdullah.

Abdullah ibn Hudhafah eventually came to Umar ibn al-Khattab and told him what had happened. Umar was greatly pleased and when he looked at the prisoners he said, “Every Muslim has a duty to kiss the head of Abdullah ibn Khudhafah and I shall start.”

Umar then got up and kissed the head of Abdullah ibn Hudhafah.

Jan - Mar 2012, Latin America, Muslim converts

Fighting Stereotypes about Latina Converts to Islam

November 19, 2009

http://hispanic-muslimah.blogspot.com/2009/11/fighting-stereotypes-about-latina.html

1. I didn’t convert for a man. Don’t insult my intelligence.

2. I didn’t convert in order to wear longer clothes and hijab to protect myself from men. * Some men will be pervs and harass you even if you wear full face niqaab. I’m working on wearing more modest clothes for Allah * swt * & out of respect for myself.

3. Oh yeaaa the majority of Latinas don’t go around in revealing clothes like mini skirts, tube tops, etc all the freaking time. We are dayum sexy in whatever we choose to wear: freakum dress or abaya! Respect for women regardless of their clothes / appearance is something the entire world needs to work on.

4. Not all Latinos are Catholics / Christians. There is a significant Latin Muslim community in countries like Venezuela and Argentina for example.

5. I’m not giving up dancing completely. Dancing with non-mahrams is haram obviously and I won’t do that anymore. On that topic, I will bust a move when I
hear a classic like “La bilirrubina.”

6. This one’s my fav: when people ask me “On a scale of 0-100, what are the chances that you come back to the church?” My answer: 0!

7. We don’t all see foreign born Muslims (from Islamic majority nations) men to be more appealing for marriage than a Latin Muslim man. My opinion is that the preference is on the man’s deen & character.

8. We don’t give up the empanadas, pastel de tres leches, and tamales upon conversion and in return for ya’ll’s biryani & falafel. We admire & like your cuisine. We just make our mother’s recipes with halaal ingredients now. No pork & wine Ok?

9. My children will speak Spanish 1st. They will call their parents “Mami & Papi” not “Ammi & baba” lol.

10. My brothers are NOT IN GANGS! Nobody in my family is involved with gangs. & btw, any family can have a black sheep … even if it’s a Muslim family … what a surprise. * rolls eyes *
Somebody seriously said she was concerned abt how my family is because she had met only one lady from my Latin American country & her brother was killed in gang related stuff.

My point with all this is, I want to educate the Islamic community about having tolerance for others! Diversity is good 🙂 Sadly, racism exists amongst our ummah (I’ve had my share of muslims giving me the cold shoulder). I came to Islam because of the equality I read about in the Qur’an. I’m a Muslim for my creator. I want to be a better Muslim to serve Allah * swt * and also to put a smile on the face of my brothers & sisters in this life.

Jan - Mar 2012, Latino Muslims

The Message to Non-Muslims

By The LADO Group

بِسْمِاللَّهِالرَّحْمَنِالرَّحِيمِ

What is the reason for this statement? Why do we need a message for non-Muslims? Why do we need a specific message to Latin Americans? In the first place, the purpose of being for the LADO Group (in English figures, Latin American Dawah Organization or The Organization for the Propagation of Islam to Latin Americans) is the propagation (or dawah) of Islam to any interested person. However, LADO’s emphasis is on teaching Islam to Latinos or Hispanics. Our basic mission is “… to promote Islam among the Latino community in the US and in our countries. We do this by becoming educated Muslims and working with other Muslims with such goals … “

Since the beginning of history, humanity has searched for the meaning of our existence – Who are we? Why are we here? Where are we going? Where did we come from? What happens after death? What is good and what is bad? Is there a supernatural world? What is the purpose of my creation? Islam gives answers to these and more questions. Let’s start with the basics of Islam.

Basic beliefs of Islam (Here)

Five pillars of Islam

1. The testimony of faith or the chaháda (šhahadah, شهادة) is the first of the five pillars of Islam. “Chaháda” means “witness” or “testify” in Arabic. The chahada is the Muslim declaration of belief in the oneness of God and in Muhammad as his final prophet. The recitation of the chaháda is done publicly. It is said daily by Muslims. Saying this creed in public automatically makes one a Muslim. The statement goes:

أشهد أن] لا إله إلاَّ الله و [أشهد أن] محمد رسول الله]

“I bear witness that there is nothing worthy of worship except God and Muhammad is his messenger.”

2. Prayer (Salat, صلاة) – The establishment of five mandatory prayers daily is the second pillar of the Islamic creed. It is the ritual prayer done by Muslims in supplication to God. In Arabic it is known as salát and in Spanish the azalá. The azallah is obligatory on all adult Muslims. In Central and South Asian languages ​​such as Persian (from Iran), Urdu (from Pakistan), Hindi (from India) and several Turkish languages ​​the prayer is commonly known by the term namaz (نماز).

The purpose of salát is above all to act as an individual’s communion with God. Prayer allows one to stand before God, thank and praise Him, and ask Him to show you the “straight path” (as mentioned in the opening chapter of the Qur’an “Suratul-Fatijah” which is recited in each I pray). Furthermore, the daily ritual prayers serve as a constant reminder to Muslims to be thankful for God’s blessings. It ensures that every Muslim gives Islam priority over all concerns, especially by turning his life around God and submitting to His will. The salát also serves as a formal method of remembrance of God.

The azala is also mentioned as a means of keeping the believer safe from moral deviation and social evil. (Quran 29:45):

Recite what has been revealed to you from Scripture! Make the azallah! The azala prohibits dishonesty and the reprehensible. But the remembrance of Allah is even more important. Allah knows what you do. “

3. Paying the obligatory tithe (Zakât, زكاة) or the azaque is the third of the five pillars of Islam. Refers to spending a fixed portion of your wealth, which is generally 2.5% of total savings, for the poor or needy, the people whose hearts need to be reconciled, the slaves, those who are in debt, those who are on the way. of God, and the travelers of the society. The basis of sazak is given in Qur’an 9: 103:

“Deduct an alms from their goods to cleanse and purify them with it! And pray for them! Your prayer calms them. Allah hears everything, knows everything. “

4. Fasting (Sawm, صوم) is refraining from eating, drinking, smoking and for the married, satisfying sexual needs from dawn to dusk in the month of Ramadan, the ninth month in the Islamic lunar calendar.

Fasting during the month of Ramadan is specifically mentioned in three consecutive verses of the Quran:

Believers! Fasting has been prescribed for you, just as it was prescribed for those who preceded you. Perhaps, thus, you fear Allah. (2: 183)

(Fasting for) counted days. And who of you is sick or traveling, an equal number of days. And those who, being able, do not fast will be able to redeem themselves by feeding the poor. And if one does good spontaneously, so much the better for him. But it is better for you to fast. If you only knew … (2: 184)

Es el mes de Ramadán, en que fue revelado el Corán como dirección para los hombres y como pruebas claras de la Dirección y del Criterio. Y quien de vosotros esté presente ese mes, que ayune en él. Y quien esté enfermo o de viaje, un número igual de días. Alá quiere hacéroslo fácil y no difícil. ¡Completad el número señalado de días y ensalzad a Alá por haberos dirigido! Quizás, así seáis agradecidos. (2:185)

The prohibitions during Ramadan include not eating, not drinking, and not having sexual intercourse between sunrise (fajr), and sunset (maghrib). During Ramadan, Muslims are also expected to put more effort into following the teachings of Islam by refraining from violence, anger, envy, greed, lust, angry and / or sarcastic responses, and gossip. Muslims must go the extra mile to get along with each other more than normal. All indescent and irreligious sights and sounds are to be avoided. Purity of thought and action is important. Fasting is a deeply personal act of worship in which Muslims seek a level of closeness to God. The act of fasting directs the heart away from worldly activities and its purpose is to cleanse the soul and rid it of harm.

Fasting during Ramadan is not mandatory for various groups for whom it would be unduly troublesome. Boys before the onset of puberty are not required to fast, although some do. Also some young children fast for half the day instead of a full day so they learn how to fast. However, if puberty is delayed, fasting becomes mandatory for both males and females after a certain age. According to the Qur’an, if fasting is dangerous to health, for example people with a disease or a medical condition or certain people of legal age, they excuse them. For example, diabetics and pregnant or breastfeeding women are not expected to fast. According to the Hadith, observing the Ramadan fast is not allowed for menstruating women. Other individuals for whom it is generally considered acceptable not to fast are those who are in battle, and travelers who intend to spend less than five days away from home. If the condition preventing fasting is only temporary, it is required to make up the missed days after the month of Ramadan but before the next Ramadan arrives. If your condition is permanent or will be present for an extended amount of time, one can make up for the fast by feeding a person in need for each day that one misses the fast.

The Islamic holiday of Eid ul-Fiter (عيد الفطر) marks the end of the Islamic fast of the month of Ramadan. Eid ul-Fiter is also known by other names throughout the Muslim world.

5. The pilgrimage to the holy city of Mecca is called Hach (حج) and it is the fifth of the Islamic pillars. This is done during the Islamic lunar month of Zul-Hichah. It is mandatory once in a lifetime for every healthy Muslim who can do it.

Despite some physical difficulties, pilgrims who complete Hajj consider it one of the greatest spiritual experiences of their lives. Many Muslims regard Hajj as one of the great achievements of civilization because it brings together people from around the world and focuses it on a single goal: the worship of God without pretensions to race or social status.

The rites of Hajj have deep psychological significance for Muslims. The pilgrimage is generally a very profound experience for those who participate. When life is lived according to the precepts of religion and the mind is in suitable condition, the pilgrimage can transform the spirit of the individual.

Six Articles of Belief

In the Hadiths of Al-Muslim and Al-Bukari, Muhammad, the messenger of God, explains, “That (faith or al-Imam) is to affirm your faith in God (Allah), his angels, his holy books, his messengers and the last day, and to believe in divine destiny be it good or bad. “

The six articles of faith are:

1. The belief in God (Allah), the Only One. There is no one and nothing else worthy of worship (the concept of taujíd). Taujid (توحيد) means the unity of God. It is the most basic pillar on which all Islam rests. Such is the importance of the taujíd that the next chapter of the Qur’an (112) is said to be 1/3 of the scripture:

“[1] Say:« He is Allah, One! [2] God, the Eternal (on whom everything depends). [3] He has not begotten, nor has he been begotten. [4] And no one is like Him. “”

Fakhrud-Din Ibn Asakir, a prominent Islamic scholar, in his book Brilliance of the Minares wrote the following about the Sunni creed:

Know, direct us Allah, that it is obligatory upon every responsible person to know that Allah is the only God in His domain.

He created the entire world, the upper and the lower, the Arsh and the Kursiyy, the heavens and the earth, and what is in them and between them. (See al-Furqan chapter of the Qur’an, 2).

All creation is subjugated to His Power. No movement of speck happens except by His will. He has no manager for creation with Him, and He has no partner in His domain. (See Quran chapters al-An’am 110, at-Taubah 129, and Surat Az-Zumar 62).

They attribute him alive and He is the Qayyum (the Holder of all that exists). Sleep does not seize him or drowsiness (See Qur’an al-Baqarah chapter 255).

He is the one who knows about the hidden and unforeseen and what is evidenced by his creation. Nothing on earth or in heaven is hidden from Him. He knows what is on earth and in sea.

Not a leaf falls without Him knowing about it. There is no grain in the darkness of the earth, nor anything that is wet or dry but is inscribed in a clear book. His knowledge encompasses everything. He knows the count of all things. (See the chapter of the Qur’an “the Geniuses” al-Jinn, 28).

He does what He wants. He has the power and energy to do what He wants. (See Quran chapters Suratul-Qaf 29 and Surat at-Takuir 29).

His domain belongs to Him and He needs none; Glory and omniscience belong to Him. He owns the decision and the creation. He has the names of perfection. No one hinders what He decreed. No one prevents what He gives. He does in His domain what He wants. He governs His creation with what He wants. (See Quran chapters al-Ma’idah 120, adh-Dhariyat 58, Surat Fussilat 12, ‘Ál `Imran 4, al-`Isra’ 23, Surat al-Qasas 68, adh-Dhariyat 56, and Surat Yunus 99).

He does not expect reward and does not fear punishment. (See Qur’an chapter adh-Dhariyat 57).

No one has a claim over Him, and no one rules over Him. Every endowment from Him is due to His generosity and every punishment from Him is just. He does not ask what He does, but He will ask others. (See Quran chapters al-`Anbiya ’23 and an-Nur 21).

He existed before creation. He doesn’t have a before or after. He does not have an above or a below, a right or a left, a front or a back, a set or a part (See Quran chapter ash-Shura 11).

It should not be said: Since when did He exist? Or Where is He? Or How is He? He existed without a place. He created the universe with his will created the existence of time. He is not limited to time and does not have a place.

Your management of one issue does not distract you from another. Disappointments do not apply to Him, and the mind does not encompass Him. He is not conceivable in the mind. It cannot be imagined or depicted with deception. He does not cling to disappointments or thoughts. (See al-Ikhlaas chapter of the Qur’an 112: 4, ash-Shura 11 and Yasin 82).

The goal of Muslims is to achieve perfection of worship. There is a very famous saying that we are told that the Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him, gave us: that we should worship God as if we could see him. And, although we cannot see Him, we believe that He is in perpetual watch over us.

2. The belief in all the prophets and messengers of God is a standard of Islam. Islamic tradition dictates that God sent prophets to every nation. Every prophet, except for Muhammad (peace be upon him), was sent to convey God’s message to a specific group or a specific nation. Muhammad’s mission is one for the whole of humanity.

The concept of prophecy in Islam is broader than in Judaism and Christianity. Muslims distinguish between a “rasul” (a messenger) and a “nabi” (a prophet). Both are divinely inspired recipients of God’s revelation. However, the messengers are given a message for a community in the form of a book and, unlike the prophets, the success of the messengers is assured by God. While all messengers are prophets, not all prophets are messengers. All prophets are in high esteem and many are mentioned by name in the Quran. All the prophets received the wahi (revelation) from God. The revelations of the prophets who received a Charía (divine code for life) are collected and put together in the form of a holy book. These prophets are also messengers.

The first prophet is Adam and the last prophet is Muhammad. Many prophets have titles which are called or known that way. The title of Muhammad (peace be upon him) is Seal of the Prophets. The title of Jesus (peace be upon him) is Messiah and Word of God. Jesus is considered a prophet like others before him. He is one of the greatest prophets and like many Christians, Muslims believe that he was the result of a miraculous birth. There are traditionally five prophets that are considered especially important in Islam: Noah (Nuh), Abraham (Ibrahim), Moses (Musa), Jesus (Isa) and Muhammad. Together these special prophets are known as Ulul Azmi (or the Resolute). There are many incidents and narratives from the lives of many prophets mentioned in the Quran. The Qur’an has a special focus and rhetorical emphasis on the careers of the first four of these five important prophets. Of all the figures before Muhammad, Moses is the most frequently mentioned in the Qur’an.

Prophet Muhammad is the last prophet sent to mankind. He is the best example of the Muslim character. Much has been written about him. Everything written indicates that he was a sincere, truthful, wise, courageous, patient, humble, compassionate, pious, respectful, generous, patient, optimistic, and grateful man.

3. The belief in the Holy Scriptures (kutub) sent by God (including the Koran) is a fundamental doctrine of Islam. The Holy Scriptures are the expedients that were dictated by God to the prophets. They include the Suhuf-i-Ibrahim (the scrolls of Abraham), the Tawrat (the Torah), the Zabur (the Psalms), the Inyil (the Gospel), and the Qur’an.

4. Creencia en los ángeles. En el Corán, los ángeles se llaman “Malaa’ ikah” (la forma singular es malak, similar a la palabra en hebreo mal’ach). La creencia en ángeles es central al Islám. El Corán, por ejemplo, fue dictada al Profeta Mujammad (la paz sea con él) por el jefe de todos los ángeles, el arcángel Gabriel (Yibríl). Los ángeles son los agentes de la revelación en el Islám.

In Islam, angels are benevolent beings created from light and do not possess free will. They dedicate themselves totally to the worship of God and perform certain functions under His Order, such as recording every human action, putting a soul to the newborn child, maintaining certain environmental conditions of the planet (such as consolidation of vegetation and distributing rain) and taking the soul at the hour of death. Angels are described as being beautiful and having different numbers of wings (Gabriel is credited as having 600 wings in their natural form, for example). They have no gender. They can take on human form but only in appearance. As such, angels do not eat, procreate, or commit sin as human beings do.

According to most Islamic scholars, angels are incapable of sin and therefore cannot fall from the grace of God. Satan, who is described as a fallen angel by Christians, is considered a separate entity made of fire. These creations are called geniuses. Geniuses, such as Satan, can choose to do wrong because they have free will like human beings. In Islam, Satan is not considered a fallen angel. The following verse of the Qur’an indicates this succinctly:

And when we said to the angels: ‘Bow down to Adam!’ They prostrated themselves, except Iblis (Satan), who was one of the geniuses and disobeyed the order of his Lord. ” (Surat al-Kahf, 18:50).

Angels, unlike the fiery nature of jinn, are beings of quality and cannot choose to disobey God, nor do they possess the ability to do evil.

Angels have various functions. Archangel Gabriel is credited with sending God’s message to all the prophets (including the Psalms, the Torah, other books of the Bible, and the Qur’an). Other angels include Michael unloading control of vegetation and rain, Sarafiel (Israfil) will blow the trumpet on the Day of Judgment (Resurrection Day), and Azrael, the angel of death. The angels Nakir and Munkar are assigned to interrogate the dead before Judgment Day; and there are nineteen angels who fearlessly oversee the punishments of hell (Surat al-Muddazzir, 74:30). There are eight massive angels that serve as pillars of the Throne of God (Surat al-Haaqqa, 69:17). Each human being is assigned two angels to write a record of all the actions done by the individual throughout his life,

Human beings do not become angels after death as is commonly thought today. People will be resurrected physically with body and soul to be judged by God on the Day of Judgment. This brings us to our next point.

5. Belief in the Day of Judgment and in the resurrection (life after death). The day called Yaum al-Quiyamah (يوم القيامة literally “day of resurrection”) is the Last Judgment in Islam. The belief in Quíyámah is a fundamental doctrine of the Islamic faith. The trials and tribulations associated with it are detailed in the Qur’an and Hadith. There are many comments from Islamic expositors and school authorities such as al-Ghazali, Ibn Kathir, Ibn Majah, Mujammad al-Bukari, and Ibn Kuzaimah who explain Quyámah in detail. All people, whether Muslim or not, are responsible for their deeds and are judged equally by Allah (God) (see Qur’an 74.38). The Quíyámah is also the name of the 75th Surata (chapter) of the Qur’an.

Quiyamah is known by many names. It is called “Day of Resurrection” in the Holy Quran 71:18. It is also known as “the Hour” (Quran 31:34, 74:47), the “Day of Counting” (Quran 72: 130), “Day of Gathering,” “Day of Reckoning,” and “Day of Punishment. ”(Quran 74: 9).

In a time unknown to man but predetermined, when people do not expect it, Allah will give permission for Quyámah to begin. The archangel Israfil, designated the Caller, will sound a trumpet sending a “Blast of Truth” (Quran 50: 37-42, 69: 13-18, 74: 8, 78:18). This event is also found in the Bible and is known as “Chofar Blowing Day” found in Ezekiel 33: 6.

The Qur’an mentions the duration of the Quyámah Day as 50,000 years. Maulana Muhammad Ali interprets this verse (ayat) as, “… One day of man’s spiritual advancement is described as being equal to fifty thousand years to demonstrate the immense greatness of that advancement. Or, the day of fifty thousand years may be the day of the final triumph of Truth in the world, from the time when revelation was first granted by man. “

During the trial, the man or woman’s book of facts will be opened, and they will be informed of every action they did and every word they said (Quran 54: 52-53). Actions taken during childhood are not judged. The factual account is so detailed that the person will be in awe of how comprehensive the account is. Even minor and trivial facts are included. When the Hour begins, some will deny that the Day of Quíyámah is occurring and will be warned that the Quíyámah precedes the Day of Sorrow (Qur’an 30: 55-57, 19:39). If one denies an act that he has committed, or refuses to acknowledge it, the parts of their bodies will testify against him.

Through judgment, however, the underlying principle is one of complete and perfect justice administered by Allah. The accounts of the judgment are also filled with emphasis that Allah is merciful and forgives, and that mercy and forgiveness will be granted on that day as it is due.

The coming of the Majdi (“the divinely directed”) will precede the second coming of Jesus (‘Isa). Islamic scholars agree that Jesus and the Majdi will work together to fight evil in the world and cement justice on earth.

“Although the entire duration of the existence of the world has already been exhausted and there is only one day before Quíyáma (Day of Judgment), Allah will extend that day to such a length of time, as to accommodate the kingdom of a person from my family (Ajlul Bayt) may he be called by my name. He will then fill the earth with peace and justice as it will have been filled with injustice and tyranny before then. ” Sajih Tirmizi, V2, P86, V9, P74-75.

6. Belief in destiny (fate) (Qadar). Qadar is generally translated as “destiny.” It is a representation of the belief called al-qada wal-qadar in Arabic. The phrase means “divine decree and predestination.” This phrase reflects the Muslim belief that God has measured each person’s life, their portion in life whether good or bad, and whether they will follow the righteous and godly path or not. This is why when Muslims refer to the future, they will say the phrase “Incha’Aláh,” or “by the will of God.” This is also found in Spanish – “hopefully” and “if God wants.” The phrase recognizes that human knowledge of the future is limited and that everything that can or cannot happen is under God’s control.

Muslims believe that divine destiny was recorded on the Preserved Tablet (al-Lawhul-Mahfuz) by God and that everything that has happened and will happen and that will come to pass is written. Many non-Muslim people have a problem with this concept because it is misunderstood. According to this belief, the action of a person is not caused by what is written on the Preserved Tablet but the action is written on the Preserved Tablet because God knows what the person will do and what the nature of the person will cause it to do.

Another perspective claims that God is the All-Knowing and therefore has wisdom of all possible futures. With divine power, God then judges what future will be allowed and man’s choice is among those God-approved possibilities.

Misconceptions

Is Islam an Arab religion?

Only about 12% of the Muslims in the world are Arab. There are more Muslims in Indonesia, for example, than in all the Arab countries combined. There are large populations of Muslims also in India, China, other parts of Asia, and in Africa. There are also significant Muslim populations in Europe.

Arabs belong to various religions including Islam, Christianity, the Druces, Judaism or others. There are other distinctions within each of these groups. Some religious groups have also developed new identities and practices of faith outside of the Middle East. One has to be careful to distinguish religion from culture. Although the Arabs are connected by language and culture, they have diverse religions. Some of the common ideas about Arabs is to think that Arab traditions are Islamic, or that Islam unites all Arabs. Most Arabs are Muslims but most Arabs in American countries are Catholic or Orthodox Christians, for example. However, in some areas, the majority are Muslim.

Islam and terrorism

When a gunman attacks a mosque in the name of Judaism, an Irish Catholic guerrilla sets a bomb in an urban area, or when Orthodox Serbs rape and kill innocent Muslim civilians, these acts are not used to stereotype an entire religion. These acts are never attributed to the religion of the authors. With all this, how many times have we heard the words ‘Islamic terrorists’ or ‘Muslim fundamentalist’ etc. linked to violence?

It should be clear that using the terms “Muslim terrorist” or “Islamic terrorist” or whatever is an oxymoron. A Muslim who kills innocent people is doing a huge sin. The very phrase is offensive and degrading to Islam. It must be avoided. When the general level of knowledge and understanding about Islam is increased, it is expected that people will keep the words “terrorism” and “Islam” separate from each other.

The Holy Quran, the word of God, teaches us many things about respect for human life:

“Do not kill anyone that God has forbidden, except for the right reason. If someone is killed without reason, we give authority to his close relative, but that this one does not exceed in revenge. It will help you. ” Holy Quran 17:33

“If, on the contrary, they incline towards peace, lean towards it too! And trust in Allah! He is the All-Hearing One, the All-Knowing One. ” Holy Quran 8:61

“Anyone who kills a person who has not killed or corrupted anyone on earth, would be as if they had killed all Humanity. And anyone who saved a life, would be as if they had saved the lives of all Humanity. Our envoys they came to them with clear proofs, but despite them, many committed excesses on earth. ” Quran 5:32

If one analyzes the situation, the question that must matter is: Is it true that the teachings of Islam encourage terrorism? The answer: Certainly and absolutely not! Islam unequivocally prohibits terrorist acts that are carried out by some deviant people. They are totally against the rules of Islam. It must be remembered that all religions have deviant sects and misguided followers. So it is his teachings that must be examined, not the actions of some individuals.

Muslims and the press

In many cases, the press seems to prefer to publish images of people who seem different or exotic. In trying to get a more interesting picture, they try to accentuate the difference between Muslims and non-Muslims. There is really a lot of variety among Muslims. Most Muslims outside the Middle East, for example, do not wear traditional clothing. This is also the case in the Middle East.

So there is also the problem of what they make out as news. Often times, it is the opinions of certain people that count as news. Some of these people include “experts” with an agenda. This is particularly the case since September 11, 2001. What Muslims would like to see in the press is fairness, accuracy, and accountability.

Like many groups, Muslims say reporters stay away unless there is a problem or if there is an international crisis to which they want a reaction. This keeps people out of sight except when there is a problem. The solution is to cover Muslim communities constantly and continually paying attention to what this community says is meaningful. In such a case, reporters can offer deeper and more comprehensive coverage. An example of this is the increase in hate crimes against Muslims and the destruction of mosques throughout the world. But this is barely reported to the news.

Andalusia (Islamic Spain)

Al-Andalus was the Arabic name given to those parts of the Iberian peninsula ruled by the Muslims from the year 711 to 1492. It refers to the mayor’s office (ca. 711-740), the emirate (750-929), the caliphate de Córdoba (929-1031) and the taifa.

Before the arrival of the Moors, King Rodrigo’s rivals had joined forces with the Aryans (followers of Aryan; an ancient Christian sect) and Jews fleeing forced conversions at the hands of the Catholic bishops who controlled the Goth monarchy. The Egyptian historian Ibn Abdul Hakim says that Rodrigo’s vassal, Julian, the Count of Ceuta had sent one of his daughters to the court of the Goths in Toledo to educate her and that Rodrigo had impregnated her. After learning of this, he went to Qayrawan (present-day Tunis) and enlisted the help of Musa ibn Nusayr, the Muslim governor in North Africa. Personal politics may have played a larger part, as Julian or other notable families were extremely unhappy with the existing state in the realm of the Goths. In exchange for land in Spain, Julian promised ships to carry Ibn Nusayr’s troops through the Strait of Hercules (the Strait of Gibraltar). So the ‘invasion’ was really an invitation.

Under the command of Tariq ibn Ziyad, a small force landed in Gibraltar on April 30, 711 CE. After a decisive victory at the Battle of Guadalete on July 19, 711, Tariq ibn Ziyad was able to bring most of the Iberian Peninsula under Muslim occupation in a seven-year campaign. They moved northeast through the Pyrenees and entered France but were defeated by the Frankish Charles Martel at the Battle of Poitiers in 732. The Iberian peninsula, with the exception of the kingdom of Asturias, became part of the Arabian empire Umayo, under from the name al-Andalus or Andalusia in Spanish. This was the beginning of almost eight centuries of Islamic rule in Spain from 711 to 1492. However, the direct influence of the Muslims in Spain lasted until at least 1614.

However, control of Spain did not remain in the hands of the Spanish Muslims. The Christian reconquest of Spain slowly took over. In 1236 the Christian reconquest carried out the conquest of the last Islamic stronghold of Granada under Mohammed ibn Alhamar from the Christian forces of Ferdinand III of Castile. After this, Granada became a vassal state to the Christian kingdom for the next 250 years. On January 2, 1492 the last Muslim leader Boabdil (Abu Abdiláh) of Granada handed over his complete control of the last Muslim stronghold to Ferdinand and Isabella, “Los Reyes Católicos.” The Portuguese reconquest culminated in 1249 with the domination of the Algarve (al-Gharb in Arabic which means the extreme west) by Afonso III.

At first, the remaining Muslims were promised the right to practice their religion freely. These Muslims were called Mudejars, which comes from the Arabic word Mudayyar (it means domesticated or manzo and was used for Muslims under Christian control or law). In 1499 a Cardinal from Spain, Ximénez de Cisneros, arrived in Granada and soon applied strong pressure to Muslims to become Christians. About 50,000 in Granada were forced by Cardinal Cisneros to baptisms and conversions. They were given the choice: either convert or leave. Many decided to leave but could not take their property. These refugees went to various parts of the world including the Americas (see below), various countries in North Africa, Mali, Sicily and Turkey. Soon after, there was an uprising now known as the first rebellion of the Alpujarras. In 1526 the Inquisitor General moved to Granada to make matters worse. But the process dragged on for many years with many Muslims feigning conversion (tachy) to survive. They were called Moriscos. Those who rejected the options of baptism or deportation to Africa were systematically eliminated.

Serious uprisings began in the mountains of the Alpujarras (this name comes from the Arabic language and means mountain region) near Granada. An uprising was so long and they fought so well that Philip II of Spain finally had to call in Austrians to put an end to it. What followed was a massive exodus of Jews, Muslims and Gypsies from Granada. They left the city and the villages into the mountain regions (and their surrounding hills) and into the rural countryside. Over time, Cisneros said that “Now there is no one in the city who is not a Christian, and all the mosques are now churches.” Finally, between 1609 and 1614, Spain issued expulsion orders to the Moriscos. Only six percent could be allowed to stay, most of whom were children and their mothers. Most, some 250,000 to 500. 000 of Moriscos were expelled. The Muslims in Spain were never heard of until recently. Today, the descendants of the Moriscos in Morocco still have the keys to the old houses they left behind in Spain.

Islam in Latin America

Islam came to the Americas via three routes. The first, which is debatable, was before Columbus. The second was the immigration of refugees escaping the Catholic Inquisition. The third was the bringing in of Muslim slaves, mostly Africans.

In his book, “They Came Before Columbus,” Professor Ivan Van Sertima argues that African and Arab Muslims or others knew of the Americas before Columbus determined to search for the Indies. In fact, he offers intriguing facts to argue his point such as linguistic cues within indigenous languages. The Taino Indians of Hispaniola (today the Dominican Republic and Haiti) reported that a people with black skin had come previously before Columbus. They came with spears with a metal alloy called gua-nin. The alloy was found to have a composition similar to those found in the African nation of Guinea. The very word, gua-nin, appears to have come from one of the West African tribes, possibly the Fula, Mandingo, Bambara, Mande, Kabunga, or others who share linguistic features.

Van Sertima or others also argue that cultural diffusion was facilitated because many indigenous people were not so different from Muslim explorers, allowing more than one wife, being very religious but at the same time tolerant, and wanting to learn new things. Some tribes are even said to have worn turbans and hijab dresses in the style of Muslim women. In fact, the myth of the god Quetzalcoatl who will return from a distant land in the west may have been inspired by Muslim explorers. Quetzalcoatl was described as being white or wearing white clothing (there are various, many contradictory traditions regarding this – white was and is a commonly worn clothing color by Muslims) and having a beard (which is a strange description since many tribes Indians are literally hairless).

Moorish Muslims came to the Americas escaping the inquisition. Many came absolutely legal as a lot were forced to convert to Catholicism. At first, their conversions were thought of as genuine and that is the reason they were allowed to travel. Later, his travels were restricted because many of the conversions were bogus conversions or conversions made to survive (tachy). Since 1503, Nicolás de Ovando, the royal governor of Hispaniola, asked Queen Isabela to ban slaves with knowledge of Portuguese and Spanish, specifically Jews and Muslims, who “were a source of scandal to the Indians and some their owners had fled ”to establish Cimarrones communities in the mountains. In 1543, a royal decree was passed prohibiting gypsies, Jews, Moors and Protestants from immigrating to the New World. In 1574, The Royal Laws and Ordinances of the Ocean Sea Indies insisted that “all Berber slaves, male and female, and Moors newly converted to Christianity, including their children, must be expelled from the Indies.” After such laws were enacted to prevent the free movement of people, Muslims came to the Americas illegally. The dissemination of these laws indicates that a significant number of Mudejars already lived in the Spanish colonies. Many of these Muslims were aided by their Christian countrymen due to their superior naval knowledge. In a world hungry for knowledge, they were frequently sought after for their wisdom. The Royal Laws and Ordinances of the Indies of the Ocean Sea insisted that “all Berber slaves, male and female, and Moors recently converted to Christianity, including their children, must be expelled from the Indies.” After such laws were enacted to prevent the free movement of people, Muslims came to the Americas illegally. The dissemination of these laws indicates that a significant number of Mudejars already lived in the Spanish colonies. Many of these Muslims were aided by their Christian countrymen due to their superior naval knowledge. In a world hungry for knowledge, they were frequently sought after for their wisdom. The Royal Laws and Ordinances of the Indies of the Ocean Sea insisted that “all Berber slaves, male and female, and Moors recently converted to Christianity, including their children, must be expelled from the Indies.” After such laws were enacted to prevent the free movement of people, Muslims came to the Americas illegally. The dissemination of these laws indicates that a significant number of Mudejars already lived in the Spanish colonies. Many of these Muslims were aided by their Christian countrymen due to their superior naval knowledge. In a world hungry for knowledge, they were frequently sought after for their wisdom. they must be expelled from the Indies. ” After such laws were enacted to prevent the free movement of people, Muslims came to the Americas illegally. The dissemination of these laws indicates that a significant number of Mudejars already lived in the Spanish colonies. Many of these Muslims were aided by their Christian countrymen due to their superior naval knowledge. In a world hungry for knowledge, they were frequently sought after for their wisdom. they must be expelled from the Indies. ” After such laws were enacted to prevent the free movement of people, Muslims came to the Americas illegally. The dissemination of these laws indicates that a significant number of Mudejars already lived in the Spanish colonies. Many of these Muslims were aided by their Christian countrymen due to their superior naval knowledge. In a world hungry for knowledge, they were frequently sought after for their wisdom. Many of these Muslims were aided by their Christian countrymen due to their superior naval knowledge. In a world hungry for knowledge, they were frequently sought after for their wisdom. Many of these Muslims were aided by their Christian countrymen due to their superior naval knowledge. In a world hungry for knowledge, they were frequently sought after for their wisdom.

The Spanish administration brought to the New World a fanatical fascination with race. They called these Breeds. The so-called pure-blooded Spaniards were almost guaranteed positions or access to them but anyone of mixed blood had their chances limited. Various ethnic groups were viewed as dangerous, immoral, uncivil, and prone to sin. Gradually, a system of racial classification developed. They included common terms like mulatto and mestizo. The racial categories, however, also included Moriscos, albinos (the descendants of a Moorish father and a Spanish father), wolves (the descendants of various races) as well as several others that included the blood of Moors. The caste or racial system was systematized in the 16th and 17th centuries,

Various slaves also reinforced the Islamic culture hidden in the early colonization of the New World. Berbers, Moors, and Africans came to the Americas in chains. Of the African Muslims, several tribal groupings survived the treacherous migration to the Americas. Some such tribes were the Mandingos, the Hausas, the Bambaras, the Yorubas, the Mandes, the Kabungas, the Kanban, the Torankas, and you see them to name just a few. Royal laws and decrees were also enacted to prevent particular African Muslim tribes from coming to the Americas due to their unpleasant influence (to the Spanish) on other African slaves. Many of the slave rebellions that occurred in the colonies were due to these African Muslims organizing for their freedom.

Unfortunately, the Islamic practices of slaves, ‘New Christians’ and free castes were suppressed. Centuries of regularized assaults on the religious convictions of these people made it difficult to transmit Islamic knowledge step by step from generation to generation. Until recently, with the immigration of Muslims to the Americas again, knowledge of an Islamic distinction was lost. Some peculiar Islamic cultural keepings (such as the prohibition of eating the pig among certain people, the use of the kerchief and mantilla, going to church on Fridays, etc.) could remain until today. However, the eradication of Islam took centuries and the memory of Islam did not fade in a short time. As late as 1835, African Muslims from Brazil (known as Malis) led the largest slave rebellion in the Americas that culminated in more than 500 sentenced to death, imprisonment, flogging, and deportation. As late as 1910, the Brazilian government counted an estimated 100,000 African Muslims living there.

How did Islam benefit us and influence our lives today?

Various inventions and cultural innovations came to the West via the Muslims. This happened particularly in Spain where students from around Europe came to study. The idea of ​​school graduation that we enjoy when we finish studying is an imitation of the learned Arabs even with the cap and gown. Another novelty was the use of symbols for numbers instead of the clumsy Roman system of letters. These symbols were adopted from India and recast by the Muslims. We can thank the Muslims for the use of paper. It was still invented by the Chinese, it was the Muslims who spread its use throughout the world. Who doesn’t get up in the morning to the smell of coffee? Some people cannot sustain themselves through the day without a drink of it. The use of coffee is a particularly ‘Saracen’ habit that the world has yet to recognize. A host of diverse topics never heard of in Europe were studied: zoology, sociology, algebra, and many more thanks to the Muslims. One notable effect in Europe that helped bring about the renaissance was the translation and transmission of the philosophical ideas and classical ideas of ancient Greece (and of India and China). The Muslims also brought foreign foods (fruits and vegetables) and spices to Europe. The list of things they did and brought to Europe is huge and can go on and on. They were directly responsible for bringing Europe out of the dark ages and into the renaissance that instead brought us to the industrial revolution and the modern age. A host of diverse topics never heard of in Europe were studied: zoology, sociology, algebra, and many more thanks to the Muslims. One notable effect in Europe that helped bring about the renaissance was the translation and transmission of the philosophical ideas and classical ideas of ancient Greece (and of India and China). The Muslims also brought foreign foods (fruits and vegetables) and spices to Europe. The list of things they did and brought to Europe is huge and can go on and on. They were directly responsible for bringing Europe out of the dark ages and into the renaissance that instead brought us to the industrial revolution and the modern age. A host of diverse topics never heard of in Europe were studied: zoology, sociology, algebra, and many more thanks to the Muslims. One notable effect in Europe that helped bring about the renaissance was the translation and transmission of the philosophical ideas and classical ideas of ancient Greece (and of India and China). The Muslims also brought foreign foods (fruits and vegetables) and spices to Europe. The list of things they did and brought to Europe is huge and can go on and on. They were directly responsible for bringing Europe out of the dark ages and into the renaissance that instead brought us to the industrial revolution and the modern age. One notable effect in Europe that helped bring about the renaissance was the translation and transmission of the philosophical ideas and classical ideas of ancient Greece (and of India and China). The Muslims also brought foreign foods (fruits and vegetables) and spices to Europe. The list of things they did and brought to Europe is huge and can go on and on. They were directly responsible for bringing Europe out of the dark ages and into the renaissance that instead brought us to the industrial revolution and the modern age. One notable effect in Europe that helped bring about the renaissance was the translation and transmission of the philosophical ideas and classical ideas of ancient Greece (and of India and China). The Muslims also brought foreign foods (fruits and vegetables) and spices to Europe. The list of things they did and brought to Europe is huge and can go on and on. They were directly responsible for bringing Europe out of the dark ages and into the renaissance that instead brought us to the industrial revolution and the modern age.

Other ways they influenced us, specifically people of Hispanic descent, is by culture and language. After 400 years of hearing from the last Moors, many Hispanics can still take pride in knowing that they are of Arabian descent as many of their last names tell us. Ancient Arabic names still survive with us, for example: Alameda (al-Muwatta), Baez (Bayás), Cid (Sayyid), Guadalupe (Wadi al-Lupus), Medina (Madinah), Toledo (Tulíta), etc. There are dozens of Arabic surnames. We also have customs that are (or were) Muslim customs, for example, the sayings and sayings’ my house is your house, ” olé !, ” go with God, ” God willing, ” hopefully, ‘ etc. Concepts of the Moors were also dispersed to our culture such as the idea of ​​’shame’ that comes from the Arabic idea “’ar. ”Other concepts of measurements such as the arrelde and the at sign come directly from Muslim usage (ar-Ratl and ar-Rub’ah). Still many believe that we are inventing this link, really where would we be without the Muslims?

Hispanic Muslims Today

There is a lot of variety among Latin American Muslims. Most choose Islam as a way of life because they see that there is no complexity in praying directly to God rather than in between. If you ask a Hispanic Muslim, “Why do you practice Islam?” they will tell you ‘because it’s the truth.’ Conversion is personal and there may be various reasons that influence the decision why someone chooses Islam.

Islam has a very long history among the Hispanics we have touched. Today there are approximately six million Muslims in Latin America. There are an estimated 1.5 million in Brazil or another million in Argentina. The rest are around Latin American countries. In the US, there are an estimated 100-200 thousand Latino Muslims. Among Hispanic Muslims there are converts and children of converts. There are also Muslims who are the children of Muslim immigrants from various countries.

Islam is a brotherhood – a brotherhood of believers. Islam is a universal brotherhood that transcends everything (see surata al-Huyurat 49:10). Islam is the truth. Furthermore, Islam is a guide and a mercy from God to all humanity. Islam teaches truth, justice, mercy, unity and equality (see Holy Quran 112: 1-4, 17:54, 59:10, and 16:97 respectively). The imperative of Islam is simple: belief in One God and obeying Him, the brotherhood of all humanity, justice and the protection of human rights.

Conclusion

In conclusion, this message is an invitation to Islam – an invitation for a better world. This message is not only for Latin Americans – this message is for all humanity. All problems in the world today (drug addiction, promiscuity, poverty, theft, corruption, etc.) have their solution with Islam. Look at your heart – are you missing something? Discover Islam – it can help you feel more complete. This message comes from our Creator – He does not need us but we are always in need of Him.

“Men! You are the ones in need of Allah (God), while Allah is the Self-Sufficient, the Praiseworthy. “Holy Qur’an 35:15.

Quotes:

Al-Djazairi, SE, “The Hidden Debt to Islamic Civilization” Bayt Al-Hikma Press 2005 ISBN # 0-9551156-1-2

Boyd Thatcher, John, “Christopher Columbus, His Life, His work, His Remains” GP Putnam & Sons 1903

Esposito, John L., “Islam: The Straight Path” Ed. Oxford University Press 2005

Esposito, John L., “Oxford Dictionary of Islam” Ed. Oxford University Press. 2003.

Gomez, Michael, “Black Crescent: The Experience and Legacy of African Muslims in the Americas” New York University Press, ISBN # 0-521-60079- 0

Harvey, Leonard Patrick, “Islamic Spain, 1250 to 1500” Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992. ISBN 0-226-31962-8.

Kennedy, Hugh, “Muslim Spain and Portugal: A Political History of al-Andalus” Longman 1996 ISBN 0-582-49515-6

Latino American Dawah Organization, www.LatinoDawah.org and www.HispanicMuslims.com

Lovejoy, Paul E, “Muslim Encounters with Slavery in Brazil”, New York University, ISBN # 1-55876-378-3

Luscombe, David, “The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume 4”, Cambridge University Press 2004 ISBN # 0-521-41411-3

Manuela, Marin, “The Formation of Al-Andalus: History and Society”, Ashgate 1998 ISBN 0-86078-708-7

Menocal, Maria Rosa, “Ornament of the World: How Muslims, Jews, and Christians Created a Culture of Tolerance in Medieval Spain”, Back Bay Books 2002 ISBN 0-316-16871-8

Netanyahu, Benzion, “The Origins Of The Inquisition In Fifteenth Century Spain” Random House, Inc. 1995 ISBN 0-679-41065-1

Olson, Christa Johanna, “The Construction and Depiction of Race in Colonial Mexico”, http://institutohemisferico.org

Reis, Joao Jose, “Slave Rebellion in Brazil: The Muslim Uprising of 1835 in Bahia” John Hopkins University Press, London 1993

Sanchez-Albornoz, Claudio, “The Islam of Spain and the West” Madrid 1974

Saudi Aramco World, “The Islamic Connection” May / June 2004 www.SaudiAramcoWorld.com

Saudi Aramco World, “The Second Flowering: Art of the Mudejars”, January / February 1993, www.SaudiAramcoWorld.com

Van Buren, Thomas, “Transnational Music and Dance in the Dominican Republic”

Van Sertima, Ivan, “The Came Before Columbus” Random House 2003

Jan - Mar 2012, Poems

What Happened

By Naida Jakirlic

12/20/02

What happened to you
O Muslim Man?
Hasn’t the prophet taught you something,
toward your wife to be gentle and kind?

Who gave you the permission
O Muslim Man?
to twist Allah’s words
to jail your women inside the home?

To school you forbid them to go
O Muslim Man!
yet when a sister is raped in another land
you pay no heed to it
and think you have Iman.

You say woman is no toy
O Muslim Man!
to the leaders of the west you say
ASTAGHFIRULLAH!
yet you commit the same crimes,
only in a different color they hide.

What happened to equality
O Muslim Man?
before Allah we will stand equal on the Day
or have you forgotten
your long-awaited fate?

What do you think
O Muslim Man?
when stand in front of Allah you shall
and answer for all the injustices
which you have bestowed upon your wife.

In the West women are too free
in the East they cannot even read,
so what will you tell Allah about your power?
how on Earth you abused it
O Muslim Man ?!

Islam, Jan - Mar 2012, Latino Muslims

The Message to non-Muslims

By The LADO Group

بِسْمِاللَّهِالرَّحْمَنِالرَّحِيمِ

What is the reason for this paper? Why do we need a message for non-Muslims? Why do we need a message to Latinos? The whole purpose or existence of LADO (Latino American Dawah Organization) is the propagation of Islam to anyone interested. However, LADO’s emphasis is to show Islam to Hispanics or Latin Americans. Our basic mission is “… to promote Islam among the Latino community within the United States by becoming better-educated Muslims and by working with like-minded Muslims …”

From the beginning of recorded history, humanity has been seeking the meaning of life – Why are we here? Who am I? Where did we come from? Where are we going? What happens after death? Does another supernatural world exist? What is the purpose of my creation? Islam answers these questions and many more. For a run down, let’s start with the basics of Islam.

Basic Islamic beliefs (Aqeeda)

Five Pillars of Islam

1. The testimony of faith or the shahaadah (šhahadah, شهادة) is the first of the five pillars of Islam. “Shahaadah” means “to testify” or “to bear witness” in Arabic. The shahaadah is the Muslim declaration of belief in the oneness of God and in Muhammad as his final prophet. Recitation of the shahaadah is done publicly. It is said daily by Muslims. Merely saying this out loud and in public automatically makes one a Muslim. The declaration goes:

أشهد أن] لا إله إلاَّ الله و [أشهد أن] محمد رسول الله]

“I testify that there is nothing worthy of worship except God and that Muhammad is His messenger.”

2. Prayer (Salat, صلاة) – the establishment of five daily obligatory prayers is the second pillar of the Islamic creed. It is the ritual prayer practiced by Muslims in supplication to God. The salaat is compulsory upon all mature Muslims. In central and south Asian languages ​​such as Persian, Urdu, Hindi and Turkic languages ​​it is commonly known by the term namaz (نماز).

The purpose of salaat is primarily to act as an individual’s communion with God. It enables one to stand in front of God, thank and praise Him, and ask for Him to show one the “right path” (as mentioned in the opening chapter of the Quran “Suratul-Fatihah” [Chapter of Opening] which is recited in every prayer). In addition, the daily ritual prayers serve as a constant reminder to Muslims that they should be grateful for God’s blessings. It ensures that every Muslim prioritizes Islam over all other concerns, thereby revolving their life around God and submitting to His will. The salaat also serves as a formal method of God’s remembrance.

The salat is also mentioned as a means to keep the believer safe from social wrong and moral deviancy (Qur’an 29:45):

“Recite what has been sent down to you of the Book, and establish the prayer. Prayer forbids indecency and dishonor. The remembrance of Allah is greater, and God knows what you do.”

3. The paying of obligatory alms (Zakât, زكاة) is the third of the five pillars of Islam. It refers to spending a fixed portion of one’s wealth, which is generally 2.5% of the total savings, for the poor or needy, people whose hearts need to be reconciled, slaves, those in debt, those in the way of God, and the travelers in the society.

The basis of zakaat is given in the Qur’an: “Of their goods take alms, that so thou mightest purify and sanctify them; and pray on their behalf, verily thy prayers are a source of security for them.” (9: 103)

4. Fasting (Sawm, صوم) is the refraining from eating, drinking, smoking and for married couples, satisfying sexual needs from dawn to dusk in the month of Ramadan, the ninth month in the Islamic lunar calendar.

Fasting during the month of Ramadan is specifically mentioned in three consecutive verses of the Qur’an:

“O ye who believe! Fasting is prescribed to you as it was prescribed to those before you, that ye may (learn) self-restraint.” (2: 183)

“(Fasting) for a fixed number of days; but if any of you is ill, or on a journey, the prescribed number (Should be made up) from days later. For those who can do it (With hardship), is a ransom, the feeding of one that is indigent. But he that will give more, of his own free will, – it is better for him. And it is better for you that ye fast, if ye only knew. ” (2: 184)

“Ramadan is the (month) in which was sent down the Qur’an, as a guide to mankind, also clear (Signs) for guidance and judgment (Between right and wrong). So every one of you who is present (at his home) during that month should spend it in fasting, but if any one is ill, or on a journey, the prescribed period (Should be made up) by days later. God intends every facility for you; He does not want to put to difficulties. (He wants you) to complete the prescribed period, and to glorify Him in that He has guided you; and perchance ye shall be grateful. ” (2: 185)

Prohibitions during Ramadan include not eating, drinking and having sexual intercourse between dawn (fajr), and sunset (maghrib). During Ramadan, Muslims are also expected to put more effort into following the teachings of Islam by refraining from violence, anger, envy, greed, lust, angry and / or sarcastic retorts, and gossip. Muslims should make an extra effort to get along with each other better than normal. All obscene and irreligious sights and sounds are to be avoided. Purity of both thought and action is important. The fast is an act of deeply personal worship in which Muslims seek a raised level of closeness to God. The act of fasting is said to redirect the heart away from worldly activities and its purpose being to cleanse your inner soul, and free it of harm.

Fasting during Ramadan is not obligatory for several groups for whom it would be excessively problematic. Children before the onset of puberty are not required to fast, though some do. Also some small children fast for half a day instead of a whole day so they get used to fasting. However, if puberty is delayed, fasting becomes obligatory for males and females after a certain age. According to Qur’an, if fasting would be dangerous to people’s health, such as to people with an illness or medical condition, and sometimes elderly people, they are excused. For example, diabetics and nursing or pregnant women usually are not expected to fast. According to Hadith, observing the Ramadan fast is not allowed for menstruating women. Other individuals for whom it is usually considered acceptable not to fast are those in battle, and travelers who intended to spend fewer than five days away from home. If one’s condition preventing fasting is only temporary, one is required to make up for the days missed after the month of Ramadan is over and before the next Ramadan arrives. If one’s condition is permanent or present for an extended amount of time, one may make up for the fast by feeding a needy person for every day missed.

The Islamic holiday of Eid ul-Fitr (عيد الفطر) marks the end of the Islamic fasting of the month of Ramadan. Eid ul-Fitr is known by various other names throughout the Muslim world as well.

5. Pilgrimage to the holy city of Mecca is called Hajj (حج) and is the fifth of the Islamic pillars. This is done during the Islamic lunar month of Zul-Hijjah. It is compulsory once in a lifetime for every able-bodied Muslim who can afford to do so.

In spite of some physical hardships, pilgrims who complete the Hajj consider it one of the greatest spiritual experiences of their lives. Many Muslims regard the Hajj as one of the great achievements of civilization because it brings together people from around the world and focuses them upon a single goal: the worship of God without pretensions to race or social status.

The Hajj rituals have a deep psychological significance for Muslims. The pilgrimage is usually a very profound experience for those who participate. When life is lived according to the precepts of the religion and the mind is in a suitable condition, the pilgrimage can spiritually transform the individual.

Six articles of belief

In the Hadith of Al-Muslim and Al-Bukhari, Muhammad (pbuh) the messenger of Almighty God explains: “That faith (or al-Imán)) is to affirm your faith in Allah, His angels, His revealed books, His messengers, and the Last Day, and to believe in the divine destiny whether good or bad. “

The six articles of the faith are:

1. Belief in God (Allah), the One. There is no one and nothing else worthy of worship (tawhid). Tawhid (توحيد) means the unity of God. It is the basic pillar on which all of Islam stands. Such is the importance of Tawhid that the following chapter of the Qur’an (112) is said to be 1/3 of the whole scripture:

“[1] Say: He, Allah, is One. [2] Allah is He on Whom all depend. [3] He begets not, nor is He begotten. [4] And none is like Him.”

Fakhrud-Din Ibn Asakir, a prominent scholar, in his book Brilliance of the Minarets wrote the following on Sunni creed:

Know, may Allah guide us and you, that it is obligatory upon every accountable person to know that Allah is the only God in His Dominion.

I have created the entire world, the upper and lower, the Arsh and Kursiyy, the heavens and earth, and what is in them and in between them. (See Surat al-Furqan, 2).

All the creation is subjugated to His Power. No speck moves except by His will. He has no manager for the creation with Him, and has no partner in Dominion. (See Surat at-Tawbah 129, Surat al-An’am 110, and Surat Az-Zumar, 62).

He is attributed with Life and is Qayyum (the Sustainer of All that exists). He is not seized by somnolence or sleep. (See Surat al-Baqarah, 255).

He is the One Who knows about the unforeseen and what is evidenced by His creation. Nothing on earth or in heaven is hidden from Him. He knows what is on land and in sea.

Not a leaf does fall but He knows about it. There is no grain in the darkness of earth, nor anything which is moist or dry but is inscribed in a clear Book. His Knowledge encompasses everything. He knows the count of all things. (See Surat al-Jinn, 28).

He does whatever He wills. He has the power to do whatever He wills. (See Surat Qaf, 29 and Surat at-Takwir, 29).

To Him is the Dominion and He needs none; to Him belong the Glory and Everlastingness. To Him are the Ruling and the Creating. He has the Names of Perfection. No one hinders what He decreed. No one prevents what He gives. He does in His dominion whatever He wills. He rules His creation with whatever He wills. (See Surat al-Ma’idah 120, Surat Adh-Dhariyat 58, Surat Fussilat 12, Surat ‘Al’ Imran 4, Surat al-‘Isra ’23, Surat adh-Dhariyat 56, Surat Yunus 99, and Surat al-Qasas 68).

He does not hope for reward and does not fear punishment. (See Surat adh-Dhariyat 57).

There is no right on Him that is binding, and no one exercises rule over Him. Every endowment from Him is due to His Generosity and every punishment from Him is just. He is not questioned about what He does, but they are questioned. (See Surat an-Nur 21 and Surat al-‘Anbiya ’23).

I have existed before the creation. He does not have a before or an after. He does not have an above or a below, a right or a left, an in front of or a behind, a whole or a part. (See Surat ash-Shura 11).

It must not be said: When was He? Or where was He? Or how is He? I have existed without a place. I have created the universe and willed for the existence of time. He is not bound to time and is not designated with place.

His management of one matter does not distract Him from another. Delusions do not apply to Him, and He is not encompassed by the mind. He is not conceivable in the mind. He is not imagined in the self nor pictured in delusions. He is not grasped with delusions or thoughts. (See Surat Yasin 82, Surat ash-Shura 11 and Surat al-Ikhlaas 112: 4).

The goal of Muslims is to obtain perfection in worship. There is a famous saying to attributed to the Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him, that we should worship God as if we can see Him. And, although we cannot see Him, Muslims undoubtedly believe He is constantly watching over us.

2. Belief in all of the Prophets (nabi) and Messengers (rusul) of God. Islamic tradition dictates that prophets were sent by God to every nation. Each prophet, with the exception of Muhammad (pbuh) was sent to convey God’s message to a specific group of people or nation. Muhammad’s mission is one for the whole of humanity.

The concept of prophecy in Islam is broader than Judaism and Christianity. Muslims distinguish between a “rasul” (a messenger) and a “nabi” (a prophet). Both are divinely inspired recipients of God’s revelation. However, messengers are given a message for a community in book form and, unlike prophets, are assured success by God. While all messengers are prophets, not all prophets are messengers. All prophets are held in high esteem and many are mentioned by name in the Qur’an. All prophets received wahi (revelation) from God. The revelations to the prophets who received a Sharia (divine code of life) were ultimately collected together in the form of a holy book. These prophets are also messengers.

The first prophet is Adam and the last prophet is Muhammad. Many prophets have titles by which they are called by. Muhammad’s (pbuh) title is Seal of the Prophets. Jesus’ (pbuh) title is Messiah and Word of God. Jesus is regarded as a prophet like others before him. He is one of the greatest prophets and like many Christians, Muslims believe that he was the result of a virgin birth. There are traditionally five prophets that are regarded as especially important in Islam: Noah (Nuh), Abraham (Ibrahim), Moses (Musa), Jesus (Isa) and Muhammad. Together these special prophets are known as Ulul Azmi (or the Resolute). There are many incidents and narratives from the lives of many prophets mentioned in the Qur’an. The Qur’an has a special focus and rhetorical emphasis on the careers of the first four of these five major prophets. Of all the figures before Muhammad, Moses is referred to most frequently in the Qur’an.

The Prophet Muhammad is the last Prophet sent to Humanity. He is the best example of the Muslim character. Much has been written about him. He has been consistently shown to have been sincere, truthful, courageous, wise, patient, forgiving, compassionate, humble, respectful, generous, grateful, and optimistic.

3. Belief in the Holy Scriptures (kutub) sent by God (including the Qur’an) is a fundamental tenet of Islam. The holy scriptures are the records that were dictated by God to prophets. They are the Suhuf-i-Ibrahim (the Scrolls of Abraham), the Tawrat (Torah), the Zabur (the Psalms), the Injil (the Gospel), and the Qur’an.

4. Belief in angelic beings (malaa’ika). In the Qur’an, angels are called “Malaa’ikah” (singular form is malak, similar to the Hebrew word mal’ach). The belief in angels is central to Islam. As with the Qur’an, it was dictated to the prophet Muhammad (pbuh) by the chief of all angels, the archangel Gabriel (Jibreel). Angels are the agents of revelation in Islam.

In Islam, angels are benevolent beings created from light and do not possess free will. They are completely devoted to the worship of God and carry out certain functions on His command, such as recording every human being’s actions, placing a soul in a newborn child, maintaining certain environmental conditions of the planet (such as nurturing vegetation and distributing the rain ) and taking the soul at the time of death. Angels are described as being beautiful and having different numbers of wings (Gabriel is attributed as having 600 wings in his natural form, for example). They have no gender. They can take on human form but only in appearance. As such, angels do not eat, procreate or commit without as humans do.

According to the majority of Islamic scholars, angels are incapable of committing sin and therefore cannot fall from grace. Satan, who is described as a fallen angel by Christians, is considered a separate entity made of fire. These are called jinn. The jinn, such as Satan, can choose to do evil because they have free-will. In Islam, Satan is not considered as a fallen angel. The following Quranic verse states this succinctly:

“And when We said to the Angels; ‘Prostrate yourselves unto Adam.’ So they prostrated themselves except Iblis. He was one of the jinn … “(Surat Al-Kahf, 18:50).

Angels, unlike the fiery nature of jinn, are beings of goodness and cannot choose to disobey God, nor do they possess the ability to do evil.

The angels have various functions. The archangel Gabriel is credited with sending the message of God to all the Prophets (including the Psalms, Torah, other books from the Bible and the Qur’an). Other angels include Michael who discharges control of vegetation and rain, Israfil (Sarafiel) will blow the trumpet at the Day of Resurrection, and Azrael, the angel of death. The angels Nakir and Munkar are assigned to interrogate the dead before Judgment Day; and there are nineteen angels over-seeing the punishments of hell unflinchingly (Surat Al-Muddaththir, 74:30). There are eight massive angels that support the Throne of God (Surat Al-Haaqqa, 69:17). Every human being is assigned two angels to write a record of all actions done by the individual throughout their life, which will be used in evidence for or against the person by God on the Day of Judgment.

Humans do not turn into angels upon death as is commonly thought nowadays. Rather they are physically resurrected in body and soul to be judged by God on judgment day. This brings us to our next point.

5. Belief in the Day of Judgment and in the Resurrection (life after death). Yawm al-Qiyamah (يوم القيامة literally “Day of the Resurrection”) is the Last Judgment in Islam. Belief in Qiyࢠmah is a fundamental tenet of faith in Islam. The trials and tribulations associated with it are detailed in both the Qur’an and the Hadith. There are many commentaries of Islamic expositors and scholarly authorities such as al-Ghazali, Ibn Kathir, Ibn Majah, Muhammad al-Bukhari, and Ibn Khuzaimah who explain Qiyamah in detail. Every human, Muslim and non-Muslim alike, is held accountable for his or her deeds and are judged by Allah (God) accordingly (Qur’an 74.38). Al-Qiyࢠmah is also the name of the 75th Sura or chapter of the Qur’an.

Qiyamah is known by many names. It is called “Day of the Resurrection” in the Holy Qur’an 71:18. It is also known as “the Hour” (Qur’an 31:34, 74:47), “Day of the Account” (Qur’an 72: 130), “Day of Gathering,” “Day of Reckoning,” and “Day of Distress” (Qur’an 74: 9).

At a time unknown to man but preordained, when people least expect it, Allah will give permission for the Qiyࢠmah to begin. The archangel Israfil, referred to as the Caller, will sound a horn sending out a “Blast of Truth” (Qur’an 50: 37-42, 69: 13-18, 74: 8, 78:18). This event is also found in Jewish eschatology, in the Jewish belief of “The Day of the Blowing of the Shofar” found in Ezekiel 33: 6

The Qu’ran mentions the duration of the Qiyamah as 50,000 years. Maulana Muhammad Ali interprets this verse (ayat) as, “… A day of the spiritual advancement of man is spoken of as being equal to fifty thousand years to show immense vastness of that advancement. Or, the day of fifty thousand years may be the day of final triumph of Truth in the world, from the time when revelation was first granted to man. “

During judgment, a man’s or a woman’s own book of deeds will be opened, and they will be apprised of every action they did and every word they spoke (Qur’an 54: 52-53). Actions taken during childhood are not judged. The account of deeds is so detailed that the man or woman will wonder at how comprehensive the account is. Even minor and trivial deeds are included. When the Hour is at hand, some will deny that al-Qiyࢠmah is taking place and will be warned that al-Qiyࢠmah precedes the Day of Pining (distress) (Qur’an 30: 55-57, 19:39 ). If one denies a deed he or she committed, or refuses to acknowledge it, his or her body parts will testify against him or her.

Throughout judgment, however, the underlying principle is that of a complete and perfect justice administered by Allah. The accounts of judgment are also replete with the emphasis that Allah is merciful and forgiving, and that mercy and forgiveness will be granted on that day insofar as it is merited.

The coming of the Mahdi (“the divinely guided one”) will precede the Second Coming of Jesus (‘Isa). It is agreed that ‘Isa (Jesus) and the Mahdi will work together to fight evil in the world and to cement justice on Earth.

“Even if the entire duration of the world’s existence has already been exhausted and only one day is left before Qiyama (Day of Judgment), Allah will expand that day to such a length of time, as to accommodate the kingdom of a person out of my Ahlul Bayt (family) who will be called by my name. He will then fill out the earth with peace and justice as it will have been full of injustice and tyranny before then. “
Sahih Tirmidhi, V2, P86, V9, P74-75.

6. Belief in Destiny (Fate) (qadar). Qadar is usually translated as “predestination” in the English language. It is a rendering of the belief called al-qada wal-qadar in Arabic. The phrase means “the divine decree and the predestination.” This phrase reflects the Muslim belief that God has measured out the span of every person’s life, their lot in life whether good or bad, and whether they will follow the straight and righteous path or not. This is why when Muslims refer to the future, they will say the phrase “Insha’Allah,” or “if God wills.” This is also found in Spanish – “ojalá” and “si Dios quiere.” The phrase recognizes that human knowledge of the future is limited and that all that may or may not come to pass is under the control of God.

Muslims believe that the divine destiny was written down in the Preserved Tablet (al-Lawhul-Mahfuz) by God and that all that has happened and will happen and which will come to pass is written. Many westerners have a problem with this concept because it is misunderstood. According to this belief, a person’s action is not caused by what is written in the Preserved Tablet but rather the action is written in the Preserved Tablet because God knows what the person’s nature will cause them to do.

Another perspective asserts that God is Omniscient and therefore has foreknowledge of all possible futures. With divine power, God then also deems which futures will be allowed and man’s choice is between those possibilities approved by God.
Misconceptions

Is Islam an Arab religion?

Only about 12% of the world’s Muslims are Arabs. There are more Muslims in Indonesia, for example, than in all Arab countries combined. Large populations of Muslims also live in India, China, other parts of Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. There are also significant Muslim populations in Europe.

Arabs belong to many religions, however, including Islam, Christianity, Druze, Judaism and others. There are further distinctions within each of these, and some religious groups have evolved new identities and faith practices outside of the Middle East. One must be careful to distinguish religion from culture. Although Arabs are connected by language and culture, they have different faiths. Common misperceptions are to think that Arab traditions are Islamic, or that Islam unifies all Arabs. Most Arabs are Muslim but most Arabs outside of the Middle East are Catholic or Orthodox Christians, for example.

Islam and Terrorism

When a gunman attacks a mosque in the name of Judaism, a Catholic IRA guerrilla sets off a bomb in an urban area, or Serbian Orthodox militiamen rape and kill innocent Muslim civilians, these acts are not used to stereotype an entire faith. Never are these acts attributed to the religion of the perpetrators. Yet how many times have we heard the words ‘Islamic or Muslim fundamentalist’ etc. linked with violence?

It should be clear that to use the term “Muslim terrorist” or “Islamic terrorist” or whatever is favored nowadays is an oxymoron. By killing innocent civilians, a Muslim is committing a tremendous sin. The very phrase is offensive and demeaning of Islam. It should be avoided. As the general level of awareness and understanding of Islam increases, it is hoped that people will keep “terrorism” and “Islam” separate from each other.

The Holy Qur’an, the word of God, teaches us a number of things with regards to human life:

“Nor take life – which Allah has made sacred – except for just cause. And if anyone is slain wrongfully, we have given his heir authority (to demand retaliation or to forgive): but let him not exceed bounds in the matter of taking life , for he is helped (by the Law). ” Qur’an 17:33

“If they seek peace, then seek you peace. And trust in Allah for He is the One that heareth and knoweth all things.” Quran 8:61

“Whoever kills a soul, unless for a soul, or for corruption done in the land, it is as if he had slain mankind entirely. And whoever saves one, it is as if he had saved mankind entirely” Qur’an 5:32

If when one analyzes the situation, the question that should come to mind is: Do the teachings of Islam encourage terrorism? The answer: Certainly not! Islam unequivocally forbids the terrorist acts that are carried out by some misguided people. They are totally against the norms of Islam. It should be remembered that all religions have cults and misguided followers, so it is their teachings that should be looked at, not the actions of a few individuals.

Muslims and the Media

In many cases, the press seems to prefer to publish or air images of people who look different and/or exotic. In trying obtain a more interesting image, they may emphasize the difference between Muslims and non-Muslims. There is actually much variety among Muslims, though. Most American Muslims do not wear traditional clothing, for example. News organizations whose collective reports give the impression that American Muslims generally dress differently than non-Muslim Americans are being inaccurate. This is also the case in the Muslim world as well.

Then there is the problem of what passes for news. Many times people’s opinions are what count as newsworthy items. Some of these people may include so-called ‘experts’ who have an agenda or an ax to grind. This is particularly the case since 11-09-2001. What Muslims would like to see portrayed in the media is fairness, accuracy, and responsibility.

Like many groups, Muslims say that reporters stay away unless there is a problem to report, or if there is a national or global crisis for which they want reaction. This keeps people out of sight except when they are associated with trouble. The solution is to cover Muslims consistently and continuously. By paying attention to what this community says is significant, reporters can offer deeper and fuller coverage. An example of this is how a spate of hate crimes against Muslims and mosque desecration is on the rise the world over but hardly any reporting makes it into news broadcasts.

Islamic Spain

Al-Andalus or Andalusia (Spanish: Andalucía) was the Arabic name given to those parts of the Iberian Peninsula governed by Muslims from 711 to 1492. It refers to the Governorate (ca. 711- 740), the Emirate (750-929) , the Caliphate of Cordoba (929-1031) and its taifa successor kingdoms.

Prior to the arrival of the Moors, the Visigothic rivals of King Roderic had gathered along with Arians (followers of Arius; an early Christian sect) and Jews fleeing forced conversions at the hands of the Catholic bishops who controlled the Visigothic monarchy. The Egyptian historian Ibn Abdel-Hakim relates that Roderic’s vassal, Julian, count of Ceuta had sent one of his daughters to the Visigothic court at Toledo for education and that Roderic had impregnated her. After learning of this, he made his way to Qayrawan (in modern day Tunisia) and requested the assistance of Musa ibn Nusayr, the Muslim governor in North Africa. Power politics and a personal vendetta may have played a larger part, as Julian and other notable families were extremely discontented with the existing status quo in the Visigothic kingdom. In exchange for lands in Spain, Julian promised ships to carry Ibn Nusayr’s troops across the Strait of Hercules (Strait of Gibraltar). Hence the ‘invasion’ was more of an invitation.

Under the command of Tariq ibn Ziyad, a small force landed in Gibraltar on April 30, 711. After a decisive victory at the Battle of Guadalete on July 19, 711, Tariq ibn-Ziyad brought most of the Iberian Peninsula under Muslim occupation in a seven-year campaign. They moved northeast across the Pyrenees and into France but were defeated by the Frank Charles Martel at the Battle of Poitiers in 732. The Iberian peninsula, except for the Kingdom of Asturias, became part of the expanding Umayyad empire, under the name of al- Andalus. This was the start of nearly eight centuries of Islamic rule in Spain from 711-1492. Muslim influence in Spain extended until at least 1614, however.

Things did not remain under Moorish control, though. Slowly the Christian reconquest (commonly referred to as La Reconquista) of Spain was under way. In 1236 the Christian Reconquista led to the conquer of the last Islamic stronghold of Granada under Mohammed ibn Alhamar to the Christian forces of Ferdinand III of Castile. From there on Granada became a vassal state to the Christian kingdom for the next 250 years until January 2, 1492 when the last Muslim leader Boabdil (Abu Abdillah) of Granada surrendered complete control of the remnants of the last Moorish stronghold Granada, to Ferdinand and Isabella, Los Reyes Catà ³licos (“The Catholic Monarchs”). The Portuguese Reconquista culminated in 1249 with the subjugation of Algarve (Arabic: al-Gharb, the extreme west) by Afonso III.

At first the Muslims were promised freedom of religious practice. They were called Mudejars (from the Arabic word Mudajjan, meaning tame or domesticated. It was a derogatory term for Muslims living under Christian rule). In 1499 the primate of Spain, Ximénez de Cisneros, arrived in Granada and was soon applying strong pressure on the Muslims to become Christian. About 50,000 Moors in Granada were coerced by Cardinal Cisneros into mass baptisms and conversion. They were given the option: they must convert or leave. Many chose to leave even though they could not take their properties with them. These refugees found their way to various parts of the world including Latin America (see below) as well as the various countries in North Africa, Mali, Sicily and Turkey. Soon after, an uprising followed known as the First Rebellion of the Alpujarras. In 1526 the Inquisitor General moved to Granada to speed things up. But the process dragged on for years with many Muslims pretending conversion (taqiyya) to survive. They were called Moriscos (Moor-like). People who refused the choices of baptism or deportation to Africa were systematically eliminated.

Serious uprisings began in the Alpujarras (Arabic: al-Bajara, literally The Highlands) mountains near Granada; one was so long and well fought that Philip II of Spain finally had to call in Austrians to help him put an end to it. What followed was a mass exodus of Moors, Jews and Gitanos (Gypsies) from Granada. They left the city and the villages to the mountain regions (and their surrounding hills) and the rural country. In time, Cisneros reported that “There is now no one in the city who is not a Christian, and all the mosques are churches.” Eventually, between 1609 and 1614, Spain gave expulsion orders to the Moriscos. Only six percent were to be allowed to stay, most of who were children and their mothers, and some 250,000 to 500,000 Moriscos were driven out. The Muslims were never to be heard of again in Spain until recent times. To this day, many of the descendants of the Moriscos within Morocco still own the keys to their ancient homes within Spain.

Islam in Latin America

Islam came to the Americas via three routes. The first, which is contentious, was before Columbus. The second was the immigration of refugees escaping the Catholic Inquisition. The third was the enslavement of Muslims, mostly Africans.

In his book, “They Came Before Columbus,” Professor Ivan Van Sertima argues that African and Arab Muslims as well as others knew of the New World before Columbus set sail. Indeed, he offers intriguing facts to argue his point such as linguistic cues within Native American languages. The Taino Indians (the Native Americans of the larger Caribbean islands) of Hispaniola (today’s Dominican Republic and Haiti) reported that a black-skinned people had previously come before Columbus with spears tipped with a metal alloy called gua-nin. The alloy was found to have a similar composition to those found in the West African nation of Guinea. The very word, gua-nin, appears to have come from one of the West African tribes: Fula, Mandingo, Bambara, Mande, Kabunga or others that share linguistic traits.

Van Sertima and others also argue that cultural dissemination was facilitated because many Native Americans were not so different from the Muslim explorers, allowing more than one wife, being very religious but at the same tolerant, and being keen on learning new things. Some tribes are said to have even worn turbans and hijab- like dresses. Indeed, the very myth of the god Quetzalcoatl returning from a distant land in the west may have been inspired by Muslim explorers. Quetzalcoatl was described as being white or wearing white (there are many contradicting traditions relating to this – white was and is a common color worn by Muslims) and having a beard (which is a strange description considering that many Native American tribes are literally beardless) .

The Moorish Muslims also came to the New World escaping the Inquisition. Many came quite legally being that lots were forced to convert to Catholicism. At first, their conversions were taken for granted and thought of a genuine which is why they had leeway to travel. Later, their travel was restricted because many of the conversions were false-conversions or conversions made in order to survive (taqiyya). As early as 1503, Nicolás de Ovando, the royal governor of Hispaniola, requested of Queen Isabela the banning of slaves with the knowledge of Portuguese and Spanish, specifically Jews and Muslims, who “were a source of scandal to the Indians and caused some to flee their owners “to establish Maroon communities in the mountains. In 1543, a royal decree was passed forbidding Gypsies, Jews, Moors and Protestants from immigrating to the New World. In 1574, Las Leyes y Ordenanzas Reales de las Indias del Mar Oceano – The Royal Laws and Ordinances of the Indies of the Ocean Sea – insisted that “all Berbers, male and female slaves, as well as Moors recently converted to Christianity, including their children, should be expelled from the Indies. ” After such laws were enacted to prevent free movement, these Muslims came to the New World illegally. The dissemination of these laws indicates that a significant amount of Mudejars were already living in the Spanish colonies. Many of these Muslims were helped by their Christian comrades, however, because of their (the Muslims’) superior naval knowledge. In a world hungry for knowledge, they were a sought after commodity. In 1574, Las Leyes y Ordenanzas Reales de las Indias del Mar Oceano – The Royal Laws and Ordinances of the Indies of the Ocean Sea – insisted that “all Berbers, male and female slaves, as well as Moors recently converted to Christianity, including their children, should be expelled from the Indies. ” After such laws were enacted to prevent free movement, these Muslims came to the New World illegally. The dissemination of these laws indicates that a significant amount of Mudejars were already living in the Spanish colonies. Many of these Muslims were helped by their Christian comrades, however, because of their (the Muslims’) superior naval knowledge. In a world hungry for knowledge, they were a sought after commodity. In 1574, Las Leyes y Ordenanzas Reales de las Indias del Mar Oceano – The Royal Laws and Ordinances of the Indies of the Ocean Sea – insisted that “all Berbers, male and female slaves, as well as Moors recently converted to Christianity, including their children, should be expelled from the Indies. ” After such laws were enacted to prevent free movement, these Muslims came to the New World illegally. The dissemination of these laws indicates that a significant amount of Mudejars were already living in the Spanish colonies. Many of these Muslims were helped by their Christian comrades, however, because of their (the Muslims’) superior naval knowledge. In a world hungry for knowledge, they were a sought after commodity. Las Laws y Ordenanzas Reales de las Indias del Mar Oceano – The Royal Laws and Ordinances of the Indies of the Ocean Sea – insisted that “all Berbers, male and female slaves, as well as Moors recently converted to Christianity, including their children, should be expelled from the Indies. ” After such laws were enacted to prevent free movement, these Muslims came to the New World illegally. The dissemination of these laws indicates that a significant amount of Mudejars were already living in the Spanish colonies. Many of these Muslims were helped by their Christian comrades, however, because of their (the Muslims’) superior naval knowledge. In a world hungry for knowledge, they were a sought after commodity. Las Laws y Ordenanzas Reales de las Indias del Mar Oceano – The Royal Laws and Ordinances of the Indies of the Ocean Sea – insisted that “all Berbers, male and female slaves, as well as Moors recently converted to Christianity, including their children, should be expelled from the Indies. ” After such laws were enacted to prevent free movement, these Muslims came to the New World illegally. The dissemination of these laws indicates that a significant amount of Mudejars were already living in the Spanish colonies. Many of these Muslims were helped by their Christian comrades, however, because of their (the Muslims’) superior naval knowledge. In a world hungry for knowledge, they were a sought after commodity. The dissemination of these laws indicates that a significant amount of Mudejars were already living in the Spanish colonies. Many of these Muslims were helped by their Christian comrades, however, because of their (the Muslims’) superior naval knowledge. In a world hungry for knowledge, they were a sought after commodity. The dissemination of these laws indicates that a significant amount of Mudejars were already living in the Spanish colonies. Many of these Muslims were helped by their Christian comrades, however, because of their (the Muslims’) superior naval knowledge. In a world hungry for knowledge, they were a sought after commodity.

The Spanish administration brought to the New World a fanatical fascination with race. These they termed castes or castes. So- called pureblooded Spaniards were almost guaranteed high-ranking positions or access to them but any hint of mixed blood was looked down upon. Different ethnic groups were looked on as dangerous, immoral, uncivil, and prone to sin. Gradually, a racial classification system evolved. They included such common terms as mulatto and mestizo. The racial categories, however, also included Moriscos, Albinos (the offspring of one Morisco parent and one Spanish parent), Lobos (the offspring of several races including Moriscos) as well as several others. The casta or racial system was systematized in the 16th and 17th centuries, which goes to show that the Moors were still active in this period in the New World.

Slaves from various stock also reinforced the hidden Islamic culture prevalent in the early colonization of the New World. Berbers, Moors, East and Sub-Saharan Africans made it to the New World bound in chains. Of the Sub-Saharan African Muslims, various tribal groupings survived the treacherous trek to the New World. Some such tribes were the Mandingo, Hausa, Bambara, Yoruba, Mande, Kabunga, Kankana, Toranka, and Vei just to name a few. Laws and royal decrees were also enacted to prevent particular tribes of African Muslims from coming to the New World because of their objectionable (to the Spaniards) influence on other African slaves. Many of the slave revolts that occurred in the colonies were due to these African Muslims organizing for their freedom. It was because of unscrupulous slave traders, however, that many of these decrees and ordinances were ignored.

Unfortunately, the Islamic practices of the slaves, ‘new Christians’ and freed caste peoples was eventually eradicated. Centuries of regularized assaults on the religious convictions of these people made it difficult for the transmission of Islamic knowledge to pass from generation to generation. Up until recently, with the immigration of Muslims to the New World again, most knowledge of an Islamic distinction was lost. Some peculiar Islamic cultural holdovers (such as the prohibition of eating pork, wearing the scarf and mantilla, attending church on Fridays, etc) may have remained until this day, however. The eradication of Islam took centuries, though, and the memory of Islam was not wiped out overnight. As it beats as 1835, the African Muslims in Brazil (known as Males) conducted the largest slave revolt in the Americas which culminated with more than 500 being sentenced to death, prison, whippings, and deportation. Even as late as 1910, the Brazilian government counted an estimated 100,000 African Muslims living there.

How did Islam come to benefit and influence our lives today?

Erudite traditions, diverse inventions and cultural innovations were passed onto the West by Muslims. This happened particularly through Spain where scholars from the rest of Europe would come to study. The idea of ​​a school “graduation,” from which we all take part of nowadays when our studies finish, complete with cap and gown (tunic and skullcap) is in complete imitation of the Muslims. Another innovation is the use of symbols for numbers instead of the clumsy Roman system of letters. They were adapted from the numbers used in India by Muslims. We can thank the Muslims for the use of paper. Although a Chinese invention, its use was spread throughout the world because of Muslims. Who doesn’t wake up in the morning to the smell of coffee? Some people cannot make it through the day without it. The use of coffee is one particular ‘Saracen’ habit that the world has yet to acknowledge. A host of diverse topics never heard of in Europe were studied: zoology, sociology, and algebra, to name a few, thanks to Muslims. A noteworthy effect on Europe that helped bring about the renaissance was the translation and transmission of classical and philosophical works and ideas from ancient Greece (as well as Persia, India and China). Muslims also brought foreign foods (fruits and vegetables) and spices with them which they introduced to Europe. The list of things they brought and did for Europe is enormous and can go on and on. They were directly responsible for bringing Europe out of the dark ages and into the Renaissance which in turn brought us into the industrial revolution and the modern age. habit that the world has yet to acknowledge. A host of diverse topics never heard of in Europe were studied: zoology, sociology, and algebra, to name a few, thanks to Muslims. A noteworthy effect on Europe that helped bring about the renaissance was the translation and transmission of classical and philosophical works and ideas from ancient Greece (as well as Persia, India and China). Muslims also brought foreign foods (fruits and vegetables) and spices with them which they introduced to Europe. The list of things they brought and did for Europe is enormous and can go on and on. They were directly responsible for bringing Europe out of the dark ages and into the Renaissance which in turn brought us into the industrial revolution and the modern age. habit that the world has yet to acknowledge. A host of diverse topics never heard of in Europe were studied: zoology, sociology, and algebra, to name a few, thanks to Muslims. A noteworthy effect on Europe that helped bring about the renaissance was the translation and transmission of classical and philosophical works and ideas from ancient Greece (as well as Persia, India and China). Muslims also brought foreign foods (fruits and vegetables) and spices with them which they introduced to Europe. The list of things they brought and did for Europe is enormous and can go on and on. They were directly responsible for bringing Europe out of the dark ages and into the Renaissance which in turn brought us into the industrial revolution and the modern age. A host of diverse topics never heard of in Europe were studied: zoology, sociology, and algebra, to name a few, thanks to Muslims. A noteworthy effect on Europe that helped bring about the renaissance was the translation and transmission of classical and philosophical works and ideas from ancient Greece (as well as Persia, India and China). Muslims also brought foreign foods (fruits and vegetables) and spices with them which they introduced to Europe. The list of things they brought and did for Europe is enormous and can go on and on. They were directly responsible for bringing Europe out of the dark ages and into the Renaissance which in turn brought us into the industrial revolution and the modern age. A host of diverse topics never heard of in Europe were studied: zoology, sociology, and algebra, to name a few, thanks to Muslims. A noteworthy effect on Europe that helped bring about the renaissance was the translation and transmission of classical and philosophical works and ideas from ancient Greece (as well as Persia, India and China). Muslims also brought foreign foods (fruits and vegetables) and spices with them which they introduced to Europe. The list of things they brought and did for Europe is enormous and can go on and on. They were directly responsible for bringing Europe out of the dark ages and into the Renaissance which in turn brought us into the industrial revolution and the modern age. A noteworthy effect on Europe that helped bring about the renaissance was the translation and transmission of classical and philosophical works and ideas from ancient Greece (as well as Persia, India and China). Muslims also brought foreign foods (fruits and vegetables) and spices with them which they introduced to Europe. The list of things they brought and did for Europe is enormous and can go on and on. They were directly responsible for bringing Europe out of the dark ages and into the Renaissance which in turn brought us into the industrial revolution and the modern age. A noteworthy effect on Europe that helped bring about the renaissance was the translation and transmission of classical and philosophical works and ideas from ancient Greece (as well as Persia, India and China). Muslims also brought foreign foods (fruits and vegetables) and spices with them which they introduced to Europe. The list of things they brought and did for Europe is enormous and can go on and on. They were directly responsible for bringing Europe out of the dark ages and into the Renaissance which in turn brought us into the industrial revolution and the modern age. Muslims also brought foreign foods (fruits and vegetables) and spices with them which they introduced to Europe. The list of things they brought and did for Europe is enormous and can go on and on. They were directly responsible for bringing Europe out of the dark ages and into the Renaissance which in turn brought us into the industrial revolution and the modern age. Muslims also brought foreign foods (fruits and vegetables) and spices with them which they introduced to Europe. The list of things they brought and did for Europe is enormous and can go on and on. They were directly responsible for bringing Europe out of the dark ages and into the Renaissance which in turn brought us into the industrial revolution and the modern age.

Other ways they have influenced us, specifically people of Hispanic descent, are through culture and language. Even after 400 years of the last known Moriscos being heard from, people of Hispanic heritage can boast having Moorish blood as many of their last names attest. Old Arabic names still survive with us to this day, such as Alameda (al-Muwatta), Baez (Bayás), Cid (Sayyid), Guadalupe (Wadi al-Lupus), Medina (Madinah), Toledo (Tulayta), etc. There are literally dozens upon dozens of Arabic surnames among Hispanics. There are also customs that are (or were) customs attributable to the Moors, for example, the saying and refrain ‘mi casa es su casa (my home is your home),’ ‘go con Dios (go with God),’ ‘ if God wants (God willing), ” I wish (God willing), ‘etc. There are other Moorish concepts and ideas that are still part of Hispanic culture such as the idea ‘vergüenza’ which is a mixture of honor and shame. The idea is originally an Arab concept called “‘ar.” Other concepts are those of measurements which are still in use today in many countries. Some of these measurements are the ‘arrelde’ and ‘arroba’ – their Arabic equivalents are ‘ar-Ratl’ and ‘ar-Rub’ah.’ Lots of people nowadays resent Muslims, however, if you think of it – where would we truly be without them? Other concepts are those of measurements which are still in use today in many countries. Some of these measurements are the ‘arrelde’ and ‘arroba’ – their Arabic equivalents are ‘ar-Ratl’ and ‘ar-Rub’ah.’ Lots of people nowadays resent Muslims, however, if you think of it – where would we truly be without them? Other concepts are those of measurements which are still in use today in many countries. Some of these measurements are the ‘arrelde’ and ‘arroba’ – their Arabic equivalents are ‘ar-Ratl’ and ‘ar-Rub’ah.’ Lots of people nowadays resent Muslims, however, if you think of it – where would we truly be without them?

Latino Muslims Today

Latino Muslims come from all walks of life. Most choose Islam as a way of life because they like the simplicity of just praying directly to God instead of an intercessor. If you ask a Latino Muslim why they chose Islam, they will invariably say “because it’s the truth.” Conversion is personal thing, of course, and many factors may influence why a personal chooses Islam.

Islam among Latinos has a long history of which we touched upon here. Today, there are approximately six million Muslims in Latin America. There are about 1½ million Muslims in Brazil and close to a million more in Argentina. The rest are scattered throughout Latin America. In the United States, there are anywhere from 100 thousand to 200 thousand Muslims of Hispanic descent. Hispanic Muslims are made up of people who converted to Islam or were born to converts of Islam as well as Muslim who were born to the faith from immigrants to Latin American countries.

Islam is a brotherhood – a brotherhood of believers. Islam is a universal brotherhood that transcends all brotherhoods (see Surat al-Hujurat 49:10). Islam is the truth. In fact, Islam is a guidance and a mercy to humanity from God. It teaches truth, justice, mercy, unity and equality (see Holy Qur’an 112: 1-4, 17:54, 59:10 and 16:97 respectively). The goals of Islam are simple: belief in the One God and obedience to Him, the brotherhood of humanity, justice and the protection of people’s rights.

Conclusion

To conclude, this message is an invitation to Islam – an invitation for a better world society. This message is not intended solely to Latinos – this message is for all humanity. All of the world’s problems (drug addiction, promiscuity, poverty, robbery, corruption, etc) have a solution in Islam. Look into your hearts – is there something missing? Discover Islam – it can help fill the gap. This message is from our Creator – verily, He does not need us but we are always in need of Him.

“O humankind! It is you who stand in need of God, whereas He alone is self-sufficient, the One to whom all praise is due.” The Holy Quran 35:15.

Notes:

Al-Djazairi, SE, “The Hidden Debt to Islamic Civilization” Bayt Al-Hikma Press 2005 ISBN # 0-9551156-1-2

Boyd Thatcher, John, “Christopher Columbus, His Life, His work, His Remains” GP Putnam & Sons 1903

Esposito, John L., “Islam: The Straight Path” Ed. Oxford University Press 2005

Esposito, John L., “Oxford Dictionary of Islam” Ed. Oxford University Press. 2003.

Gomez, Michael, “Black Crescent: The Experience and Legacy of African Muslims in the Americas” New York University Press, ISBN # 0-521-60079-0

Harvey, Leonard Patrick, “Islamic Spain, 1250 to 1500” Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992. ISBN 0-226-31962-8.

Kennedy, Hugh, “Muslim Spain and Portugal: A Political History of al-Andalus” Longman 1996 ISBN 0-582-49515-6

Latino American Dawah Organization, Muslim Organizations in Latin America www.LatinoDawah.org & www.HispanicMuslims.com

Lovejoy, Paul E, “Muslim Encounters with Slavery in Brazil” New York University, ISBN # 1-55876-378-3

Luscombe, David, “The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume 4” Cambridge University Press 2004 ISBN # 0-521-41411-3

Manuela, Marin, “The Formation of Al-Andalus: History and Society” Ashgate 1998 ISBN 0-86078-708-7

Menocal, Maria Rosa, “Ornament of the World: How Muslims, Jews, and Christians Created a Culture of Tolerance in Medieval Spain” Back Bay Books 2002 ISBN 0-316-16871-8

Netanyahu, Benzion, “The Origins Of The Inquisition In Fifteenth Century Spain” Random House, Inc. 1995 ISBN 0-679-41065-1

Olson, Christa Johanna, “The Construction and Depiction of Race in Colonial Mexico” http://institutohemisferico.org

Reis, Joao Jose, “Slave Rebellion in Brazil: The Muslim Uprising of 1835 in Bahia” John Hopkins University Press, London 1993

Sanchez-Albornoz, Claudio, “The Islam of Spain and the West” Madrid 1974

Saudi Aramco World, “The Islamic Connection” May / June 2004 www.SaudiAramcoWorld.com

Saudi Aramco World, “The Second Flowering: Art of the Mudejars” January / February 1993 www.SaudiAramcoWorld.com

Van Buren, Thomas, “Transnational Music and Dance in the Dominican Republic”

Van Sertima, Ivan, “The Came Before Columbus” Random House 2003

Jan - Mar 2012, Quotes of the Month

Quotes of the Month

The Prophet used to invoke Allah at night, saying, “O Allah: All the Praises are for You: You are the Lord of the Heavens and the Earth. All the Praises are for You; You are the Maintainer of the Heaven and the Earth and whatever is in them. All the Praises are for You; You are the Light of the Heavens and the Earth. Your Word is the Truth, and Your Promise is the Truth, and the Meeting with You is the Truth, and Paradise is the Truth, and the (Hell) Fire is the Truth, and the Hour is the Truth. O Allah! I surrender myself to You, and I believe in You and I depend upon You, and I repent to You and with You (Your evidences ) I stand against my opponents, and to you I leave the judgment (for those who refuse my message). O Allah! Forgive me my sins that I did in the past or will do in the future, and also the sins I did in secret or in public.You are my only God (Whom I worship) and there is no other God for me (ie I worship none but You). “- Sahih Bukhari 9/93/482. Narrated Ibn ‘Abbas.

Abdullah ibn Amr reported: The Messenger of Allah, peace and blessings be upon him, said, “He has succeeded who embraces Islam, whose provision is sufficient, and who is content with what Allah has given him.” – Sahih Muslim 1054.

“Those who believe, and do deeds of righteousness, and establish regular prayers and regular charity, will have their reward with their Lord: on them shall be no fear, nor shall they grieve.” – Quran 2: 277.

“Mathematics, astronomy, botany, history, philosophy and jurisprudence were to be mastered in Spain, and Spain alone. Whatever makes a kingdom great and prosperous, whatever tends to refinement and civilization, was found in Muslim Spain.” – Stanley Lane-Poole, The Moors in Spain.